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ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

Welcome to the Cisco Networking Professionals Ask the Expert conversation. This is an opportunity to discuss Wireless LANs and Mobility with Cisco expert Bruce Alexander. Bruce is a Technical Marketing Manager for Cisco’s Wireless Networking Business Unit. Feel free to post any questions relating to Wireless LANs and Mobility.

Bruce may not be able to answer each question due to the volume expected during this event. Our moderators will post many of the unanswered questions in other discussion forums shortly after the event. This event lasts through May 18. Visit this forum often to view responses to your questions and the questions of other community members.

18 REPLIES
New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

I currently have a Aironet 340 series base station at home. I'm connected to a cable modem and from there I connect to my ISP. My problem is that I'm trying to enable WEP encryption, I've programed the wep key into both of the network cards (aironet 340 series pci) using the Client Encryption Manager, I've also use the Base Station Utility to specify using WEP and I've entered in the wep key I used in the CEM. But now it says I'm not associated? After setting up both the basestation and the pci card using the BSU software if says, restart the basestation and click ok when the light blinks amber. It never does blink, it goes from a blinking green to a solid green.

any ideas?

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

Hi Scott,

Please try the following when changing any parameters on the Basestation or client card.

First, use the BSCU for all changes. You are able to manage the WEP key configuration using BSCU as well as CEM, but we might as well stay with one utility.

Second, WEP is enabled by default, so we will start with the assumption that WEP is on and set to default values.

1) To change the WEP key, first start BSCU.

2) Click on the Client pull-down menu, then click EDIT CLIENT PROPERTIES.

3) Enter your changes to the WEP key value.

4) Click OK

5) Now go into the setup BaseStation menu.

6) Click Edit Basestation Settings.

7) Click next until you reach the WEP key setup menu

8) Enter the same WEP key value that you used for the client card.

9) Click next until you reach the screen which states that you must reset the Basestation.

You may see a message on the BSCU screen that says you are not associated.

Thats OK.

How do I get the middle LED to flash amber ?

1) What you must do now is get the basestation into " program mode ".

2) Take a straightened paperclip or similar item and insert it into the small hole located next to the power jack until you can feel the small pushbutton switch inside.

3) Push and hold that switch in for about 10 seconds.

4) The middle LED ( status ) will flash amber.

5) At this point, click OK in BSCU.

6) Continue holding the pushbutton for about 10 seconds more.

7) The client should reassociate and your new settings are now in effect.

Regards,

Frank Smith

Technical Marketing Engineer

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

Any issues to be aware of regarding 2.4 gHz radio systems and pacemakers? We have some nursing homes interested in bridging and in-building wireless. Any info or documentation would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

There is a document available for download from the WLANA website which addresses the issue of Wireless LANS and consumer safety. The URL is http://www.wlana.com/learn/health.htm. Also, in September of 1996, an independent test was conducted by a hospital, before the installation of Cisco Spread Spectrum Systems. The results showed that the Cisco Systems 2.4 GHz Radios devices did not interfere or degrade the performance of heart pacemakers when operated at close proximity to such a device. In addition, all Cisco Systems radio based products comply with both the ANSI C95.1-1991 IEEE Standards for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure as well as the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology Bulletin 65 Evaluating Compliance with the FCC Guidelines for Human Exposure. The Cisco Systems radios are evaluated for RF Safety Compliance per the requirements of FCC Part 2.1091 and 2.1093 of the FCC rules as well as RSS-102 requirements from Industry Canada. The compliance is based on the results of the Maximum Permissible Exposure Studies for mobile or fixed devices and per Specific Absorption Rate Tests for portable devices.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

Can you run VOIP adequately over the Aironet 340 or 350 series bridge?

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

Yes, each bridge has a radio datarate of 11 Mb however, actual throughput is approximately 4-6 Mb. Although presently, QoS for VOIP has not been implemented, the bridge can handle VOIP traffic.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

I know this is somewhat different from the subject at-hand. But, I really could use some help. Can anyone please tell me where I can lease a T-1 and T3 line (or a 2 - 10 megabit/second) line over sat. for outside of the US?

I would really appreciate it!

yekety@aol.com

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

In Singapore, if there's any need for sat links it's usually thru' local telco, Singtel. I believe other countries should be the same.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

Do you know of any implementation of Wireless Lan at Nuclear Power Plants? Specifically, inside the containment building? I have a customer that is considering this option and wanted to visit a site that had already implemented Wireless LAN. Can you help?

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

One of our Systems Engineers has installed many of our Access Points inside Nuclear facilities in North Carolina. I don't believe they were installed specifically in the containment building. I have sent some emails out for additional information and will advise if we have more that we can share.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

I'm looking for a list of error codes for the 340 series bridge. Specifically a " Radio Error: xx Holdoff timeouts. Any Ideas??

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

While most of the error codes for the product are in the Logs and Statistics chapters of the users manual, this particular one is not.

The first part of the error indicates that it is an error occurring on the radio side. A hold-off indicates that the radio (which listens before it transmits) heard some RF energy on the channel, and had to 'wait' for the channel to be clear. After waiting for several packet periods, if the channel is still busy, a hold-off timeout error is generated.

A hold-off may occur when other units are transmitting in the same area. This 'listen before transmitting' helps to prevent collisions. However if the channel is busy for a long period of time, well beyond what another wireless packets should have taken to complete, then a hold-off timeout error is issues, and the transmitter goes ahead and sends the waiting packet.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

Hi!

I'm an employee in a small company with two offices in a small town. We need to link these together. A fast connection without hourly telephone cost.

Then I read about Aironet. I've searched the whole website, but i can't find a sample of a network where two "far-away"-offices is linked together.

My question is: Can you give me a list of products that I need to buy in order to get it running? (the cheapest solution) There is no free-sight between the offices and the distance is 0,8-1km.

Thanks!

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

If you want to connect two buildings (or two separate networks) you would want to use the Bridge series products. The BR342 series bridge, 11Mb bridge product part number AIR-BR342.

To reach 1Km, I would use two 8.5dBi patch antennas part number AIR-ANT3549. To connect the antennas you will need an antenna cable. Lengths available are 20, 50, 75 and 100 feet. The base number is AIR-420-003346 followed by -020, -050, -075 and -100 for the length in feet.

You should also use a lightning arrestor to protect against god old mother nature. This is part number AIR-ACC3354.

However, one thing- line of sight between the two antennas is required. If this is not possible, the use of masts towers, etc will be required.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

First I want to thank you for your quick response to my previous question. New question is, could you point me in the right direction for links or articles relating to health issues conerning wireless. I have an employee who has voiced concern about the possiblity of her work environment being flooded with RF.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

RF experts at the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) have developed a guide for safe

usage to prevent harmful effects of RF energy. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) under

publication C-95.1 - 1991 publishes this guide, which covers non-ionizing RF energy.

As of January 1st of 1997, RF devices from Amateur radio stations, cellular phones, Spread Spectrum

data radios, and other RF devices are required to meet the RF safety limits set forth by the FCC in Docket

96-362 (NPRM 93-62). This OET Bulletin number 65 is entitled Evaluating Compliance with the FCC

Guidelines for Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields.

All Cisco Systems radio based products comply with both the ANSI C95.1-1991 IEEE Standards for

Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure as well as the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology

Bulletin 65 Evaluating Compliance with the FCC Guidelines for Human Exposure. The Cisco Systems

radios are evaluated for RF Safety Compliance per the requirements of FCC Part 2.1091 and 2.1093 of

the FCC rules as well as RSS-102 requirements from Industry Canada. The compliance is based on the

results of the Maximum Permissible Exposure Studies for mobile or fixed devices and per Specific

Absorption Rate Tests for portable devices.

For portable devices, the spread spectrum radios operate at one-tenth of the recommend exposure

requirements for this type of device.

Cisco Systems products are also designed to reduce emissions, which can interfere with medical devices.

Cisco Systems products such as the various spread spectrum radio meet both the FCC and European

emission levels required for devices operating in medical environment specifically EN 55011 emission

standards.

In September of 1996, an independent test was conducted by a hospital, before the installation of Cisco

Spread Spectrum Systems. The results showed that the Cisco Systems 2.4 GHz Radios devices did not

interfere or degrade the performance of heart pacemakers when operated at close proximity to such a

device.

As a side note, the 2.4GHz products fall into the ISM band which stands for industrial, scientific and medical. So the use of the band, and associated product have become popular in hospitals. In fact Marquete Medical (a healthcare product manufacturer) and others actuall integrate the Cisco radio into thier patient monitors that sit on a patients bad.

Other information can be found at http://www.wlana.com/learn/health.htm.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

I have a air-LMC340 pci card. Is it possible to remove the PC card and use it on its own.

New Member

Re: ASK THE EXPERT- Wireless LANs and Mobility

The Cisco PCI card take a different approach that most other Wireless vendors. We do not use a PCI to PCMCIA adaptor to make our card work. The PCMCIA card is actually configured differently at the factory to take advantage of high speed access of the radio. This permits the PCI bus of the computer to communicate directly to the radio, rather than go through a PCMCIA controller.

While it may seem like a strange thing to do, it provides a much faster and much better PCI product than using a PCI to PCMCIA slot adaptor like others.

For this reason the card that is installed on the PCI card is not a standard PCMCIA card, and will not work in a standard PC card slot.

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