Cisco Support Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Announcements

Welcome to Cisco Support Community. We would love to have your feedback.

For an introduction to the new site, click here. If you'd prefer to explore, try our test area to get started. And see here for current known issues.

New Member

Project: Upgrade an ASA 5520 disk0:/asa803-k8.bin to ASA 5545x disk0:/asa911-k8.bin

Hello

 

This project is complex and I need some guidance on a couple of things.

 

1). The current ASA5520 has an IOS of disk0:/asa803-k8.bi. The new ASA is a 5545x with an IOS of asa911-k8.bin.

I don't have an ASA where I can upgrade the 803 to an 8.4 and then onto 911

 

How can i transfer the config from the 803 and have it syntactically correct for the 911 version?

sMc
3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions

Hi Steve,Even if you do with

Hi Steve,

Even if you do with the linear upgrade... you will not get the exact conversion of configuration when you do it with 9.1 version.

 

There are conversion tool available.... You can do with that.... But we cannot assure you the 100% result....

 

or you can go through the changes post 8.3 version asa.... and manually do with the changes....

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/security/asa/asa83/upgrading/migrating.html

 

Manually doing that would be the best option....

 

Major changes on ACL/NAT/VPN configurations......

 

Regards

Karthik

 

Hall of Fame Super Silver

A lot depends on how much

A lot depends on how much your current configuration is using NAT and outside_in access-lists. As Karthik alluded to, those are the big changes in the newer syntax versions (8.3+).

If all you have is a simple outbound NAT to the ASA interface address and no incoming access-lists on the outside interface, then 95% of your configuration remains the same. If you have hundreds of NAT entries and long access-lists then a lot will change.

If your 5520  is old enough to be running 8.0(3) you very likely do not have the required 2 GB of RAM necessary for 8.3+ software.

If you are OK with the RAM requirement, an upgrade is relatively easy although the automatic parsing of old syntax and replacement with new is not always 100% accurate. You can revert but it requires some skill and experience to do this smoothly.

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Yes - so you have a pretty

Yes - so you have a pretty sizable amount of OUTSIDE_IN statements - 103 lines is relatively high for an incoming access-list unless you are hosting a lot of publicly accessible servers.

Your basic NAT is really only three classes in the five statements: "0" is traffic exempted from NAT, "2" says use the global statement 2 address for traffic matching the SIU_NAT access-list and "1" statements say to use global statement 1 for those three subnets. I'm not sure about your separate NAT_EXEMPTION acess-list as the nat 0 appears to call access-list outside_nat0_outbound.

These are all indicators of complexity and highlight the need to approach the project with a bit more care and planning. If you have a partner you can use for assistance who perhaps has some experience with such upgrades / conversions it would be a recommended path.

While this can be done "on your own" it will require some careful research and planning and their may be missteps along the way that could potentially impact your business which the ASA supports.

11 REPLIES

Hi Steve,Even if you do with

Hi Steve,

Even if you do with the linear upgrade... you will not get the exact conversion of configuration when you do it with 9.1 version.

 

There are conversion tool available.... You can do with that.... But we cannot assure you the 100% result....

 

or you can go through the changes post 8.3 version asa.... and manually do with the changes....

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/security/asa/asa83/upgrading/migrating.html

 

Manually doing that would be the best option....

 

Major changes on ACL/NAT/VPN configurations......

 

Regards

Karthik

 

New Member

Karthik Thank you for the

Karthik

 

Thank you for the response.

 

I need to upgrade from disk0:/asa803-k8.bi. or is the 8.3 you referenced the same?

So i guess I need to know how to upgrade from 8.03 to 8.3

 

 

sMc
Hall of Fame Super Silver

No the 8.3 that is mentioned

No the 8.3 that is mentioned is quite different from 803. There was a major rewrite of the ASA code that happened at the introduction of 8.3. The differences are especially evident in the processing of access lists and of doing address translation.

 

There was mention of a migration tool which was to help with the transition to 8.3. I tried that tool and found that it did not work well. (that was quite a while ago. If you are a real optimist you can hope that they have revised and improved it - but I would not count on it and would suggest that you do the transition manually).

 

I would suggest that you upgrade your code from 8.0(3) to 8.3 or 8.4 and then perhaps from that level to 9.1. You should be able to do that on your 5520 and you will need to resolve issues about changing syntax etc between those versions. Then if you have a config with 9.1 syntax you can move that config to the 5545X.

 

You may find the discussion about upgrading software in these release notes to be helpful

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/security/asa/asa91/release/notes/asarn91.pdf

note that they suggest upgrading to 8.4(6) and from there to 9.1.

 

HTH

 

Rick

New Member

Rick Thank you for the

Rick

 

Thank you for the response.

I was able to locate an old 5510 that currently has version 8.24.

I have a text file with the current production ASA (5520) config. Would it possible to tftp that config from my computer to the Asa5510 and then issue a command to use that text file as running config?

sMc
Hall of Fame Super Silver

A lot depends on how much

A lot depends on how much your current configuration is using NAT and outside_in access-lists. As Karthik alluded to, those are the big changes in the newer syntax versions (8.3+).

If all you have is a simple outbound NAT to the ASA interface address and no incoming access-lists on the outside interface, then 95% of your configuration remains the same. If you have hundreds of NAT entries and long access-lists then a lot will change.

If your 5520  is old enough to be running 8.0(3) you very likely do not have the required 2 GB of RAM necessary for 8.3+ software.

If you are OK with the RAM requirement, an upgrade is relatively easy although the automatic parsing of old syntax and replacement with new is not always 100% accurate. You can revert but it requires some skill and experience to do this smoothly.

New Member

Marvin Thank you for the

Marvin

 

Thank you for the response

 

I have 103 access-list OUTSIDE_IN statements

I have (5)

nat (outside) 0 access-list outside_nat0_outbound_1

nat (outside) 2 access-list SIU_NAT outside

nat (outside) 1 10.5.x.0 255.255.255.0

nat (outside) 1 10.74.x.0 255.255.255.0

nat (outside) 1 10.75.x.0 255.255.255.0

 

What about these statements (100's of these)

access-list NAT_EXEMPTION

 

sMc
Hall of Fame Super Silver

Yes - so you have a pretty

Yes - so you have a pretty sizable amount of OUTSIDE_IN statements - 103 lines is relatively high for an incoming access-list unless you are hosting a lot of publicly accessible servers.

Your basic NAT is really only three classes in the five statements: "0" is traffic exempted from NAT, "2" says use the global statement 2 address for traffic matching the SIU_NAT access-list and "1" statements say to use global statement 1 for those three subnets. I'm not sure about your separate NAT_EXEMPTION acess-list as the nat 0 appears to call access-list outside_nat0_outbound.

These are all indicators of complexity and highlight the need to approach the project with a bit more care and planning. If you have a partner you can use for assistance who perhaps has some experience with such upgrades / conversions it would be a recommended path.

While this can be done "on your own" it will require some careful research and planning and their may be missteps along the way that could potentially impact your business which the ASA supports.

New Member

Marvin Thanks again for

Marvin

 

Thanks again for response.

 

Unfortunately, I am the resource and will have to, step-by-step, complete this task.

I found and old 5510 with a 8.24 version. My plan is to apply the current prod ASA config here. 

Then upgrade this device to 8.4 while verifying the config is migrating as accurately as possible.

 

 

sMc
Hall of Fame Super Silver

Doing it offline on a non

Doing it offline on a non-production unit to work through the changes is a good choice when you have that ability. Get a copy of the config before and after and compare them side-by-side with a diff tool like ExamDiff.

The one downside of using a 5510 is that it's interfaces are named a bit differently than a 5520 (or 5545-X) so you'll have to take that into account.

We'll be happy to help along the way - good luck..

New Member

W O W!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The

W O W!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

The difference between 824 and 8465 is monstrous.

 

What I have done so far

    Use the commands after each IOS upgrade

         term pager 0

         more system:running-config

 

     compared prior IOS to newer IOS

        -asa803 compared to asa824 was pretty close. easy enough to complete upgrade

 

        -asa824 to asa864 - HUGE!! difference. Alot of changes have the statement "created  

        during migration", but not all of them. Also, quite a few are not in same order as b4.

 

Should I have upgraded from asa824 to asa83x before jumping directly to 8465?

 

Please advise on how to compare 824 to 846 when they are so different

sMc
Hall of Fame Super Silver

The difference between pre-8

The difference between pre-8.3 and 8.3+ configuration files is unavoidable. It doesn't matter how small a step you take - when you cross that boundary the NAT syntax changes completely, access-lists refer to real IPs, etc.

Most people advise skipping past 8.3 (x) as it was a. pretty buggy and b. adds no value as an intermediate step.

To compare old-new configs you need to develop an understanding of how the syntax and concepts changed. Those of us who've done it a number of times advise taking the time to analyze your current configuration and taking the opportunity to re-do the NAT manually to better understand your running configuration.

298
Views
0
Helpful
11
Replies