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Webcast-Catalyst9k
New Member

connections x-over and straight through

Hi all , for ccent exam is this correct

pc to pc - straight

switch to hub - straight

switch to switch - x-over

switch to pc - straight

pc to router - x-over

4 REPLIES

Re: connections x-over and straight through

Hi,

Routers, wireless access point Ethernet ports, and PC NICs all send using pins 1 and 2, whereas hubs and switches send using pins 3 and 6. Straight-through cables are used when connecting devices that use the opposite pairs of pins to transmit data (Tx to Rx and Rx to Tx), if the devices are the same (use the same pins for Tx and Rx) then we must use a cross-over cable to cross the transmission.

BR,

Mohammed Mahmoud.

Super Bronze

Re: connections x-over and straight through

No, for instance pc-to-pc Ethernet RJ-45 would normally use x-over. Answer really depends on whether the port is MDI or MDI-X. Some older network devices might have two physical jacks for the port (MDI and MDI-X), dedicated uplink port, or method to configure MDI or MDI-X for the port. Some of the latest devices will auto configure themselves. More info in this Wiki article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium_dependent_interface

New Member

Re: connections x-over and straight through

Carl,

You will need a crossover between pc to pc.

The rst looks good.

Said

Green

Re: connections x-over and straight through

pc - pc - cross

switch to hub - cross

switch to switch to switch - cross

switch (hub) to pc - straight

pc to router - cross

When things are "normal' use a straight through, when things are the same, or occupy the same place connecting to a device (like a router and a PC would both connect to a switch), then use a crossover.

For nearly every test, console cables are "rolled" (also usually described as DB9 and rolled cable)

One more time ... try this inter-networking guide. It's an online version of Cisco Inter-networking Guide, a large and expensive book, but the online version is free.

It can be searched, it answers a lot of questions ... give it a shot.

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/ito_doc/index.htm

Good Luck

Scott

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