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standard traffic flow in a network

HI

when we work in a network then we face a problem overflow of trafic/packet .

so If normal 100 user in a network work then how packet flow in a second ?.

Like example normal condition in a router

processor 30% and when it ups 50% or avobe then wrong something.

so anyone advice me standerd flow of packet in a network ?.

Thanks

Biplob

2 REPLIES

Re: standard traffic flow in a network

Hi

It all depends upon the traffic pattern or the applications being accessed as well as the kinda of traffic traverse out thru the WAN Link.

The best suggestion would be marking ur B/W utilisation using snmp traps to the external server which may be running any of the traffic monitoring softwares.That will help u out to read/study the traffic pattern on the links both lan and wan links.

Also you can enable netflow and check out the geniunity of the traffic being handled by the router.

Once you find something alarming then you can take up the necessary steps to mitigate the junk traffic.

Regarding processor utilistaion it depends on the process enabled on the router like VPN,NAT,routing protocols...

But if its reaching upto 50% then u shuld check up the process which is hogging up the processor.

regds

Green

Re: standard traffic flow in a network

Other things to keep in mind are things that drive the processor utilization up, like access lists, and things that (may) unnecessarily use the bandwidth, like routing updates.

Depending on the topology / layout of your network, you may be better off using static routes.

Also check to see that only the features you are using are enabled on the router ... every additional process adds some load to the processor.

Other sources may be excessive broadcasts. Have you checked the hosts for worms and viruses?

Similar problem; Are any of your hosts allowed to use applications like BitTorrent or other streaming services? Many of those applications will bring up a server process and (server or not) eat a large chunk of the bandwidth.

Post some of your interface stats and a typical router config. Some description or diagrams of the network would also be helpful.

Good Luck

Scott

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