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Community Member

802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

Hi,

I want to use the fast wireless channels (that only some computers can see) only for office computers with wireless adapters, and the slower single band n channels for printers and mobile devices etc. However, whenever I activate the slower 802.11b/g/n network, ALL devices connect to the slower network and no device connects to the 300 Mbps fast network. I use the newest adapters (either laptops' own PCI-e adapters or Linksys or ASUS 450 Mbps adapters), so there should not be any problem regarding those.

Is there a way that I can make sure that the computers with the right wireless adapters only connect to the fast dual band 802.11n network?

Thanks!

Tibet

PS: Distance is not a problem, there is an access point literally near every computer!!

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
VIP Purple

Re: 802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

Hi Tibet,

 I could not find the wireless card properties to use 5GHz, so if you could find a solution as I wrote above, that would be great.

If you are using windows OS, then you can configure your wireless NIC to prefer 5GHz over 2.4GHz. Here is how you set it  on windows 7 ( Control Pannel -> Network & Internet -> Network Connection -> Wireless Network Connection -> Properties [right-mouse-click] -> Configure -> Advanced -> Preferred band)

Intel-N6205.PNG

HTH

Rasika

**** Pls rate all useful resposnes ****    

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: 802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

5ghz only ssid using 802.11n = up to 300mbps

2.4 only ssid using 802.11n = up to 144mbps

So create 2 SSID's and only allow 802.11a for the 300mbps ssid and only allow 802.11g for 144mbps ssid.

If you can't configure the wireless card properties, then this is what you need to do.

Sent from Cisco Technical Support iPhone App

-Scott
*** Please rate helpful posts ***
9 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Blue

802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

Sure, create an SSID exclusively for 802.11b.

Community Member

802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

That solution would be perfect, but how? I tried to look into the specs of the SSIDs using the WLANs menu of my controller (WLC 2504). However, I couldn't see any place where I could change the signals used for the networks.

Best,

Tibet

Hall of Fame Super Blue

802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

1.  Create a new SSID for the low-speed clients. 

2.  Go to wireless and go RF Profile.

3.  Create a new one for 802.11b and only allow 1, 2, 5.5 Mbps.  Disable the rest.

4.  Go to WLAN and go AP Groups. 

5.  Create a new AP Group.

6.  Under SSID, choose the SSID you've created in Step 1.

7.  Under RF Profile, choose the profile you've created in Step 3.

8.  Choose the AP where you want this SSID to be used.

Community Member

802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

I feel like I am getting closer, but I could not quite solve the problem. I want all APs to distribute all signals. Hence, grouping would not work for me.

I can create one SSID only for 801.11b. That would solve the low-speed connection problem. However, if I do that and open the channels with the 2GHz width, the fast speed computers start automatically connecting to those channels, and get connection speeds only up to 150Mbps.

Hence, I would like one SSID exclusively for the 5GHz 801.11n and one for the 2GHz b. How would this be? If this is not possible, is there a setting in windows that I can use that would force the computers to connect to the 5GHz 300 Mbps channels?

Best,

Tibet

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: 802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

You can setup the wireless card properties to either use 2.4 or 5ghz. The only thing you can set on the WLC is what you want to allow for an ssid or band. Your client devices will choose unless to configure it to only associate to a specific band. There are other ways that it might work, but without seeing your environment and how things are setup, it's too hard to tell you on a forum.

To be honest, I don't see why you would want to do this. If you have a lot of clients per AP maybe this would be a workaround, but in a typical real environment, I would just limit a single ssid to maybe 802.11a/g and allow another ssid to have it all.

Sent from Cisco Technical Support iPhone App

-Scott
*** Please rate helpful posts ***
Community Member

Re: 802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

The system is really simple, there is a wlc 2504 with 9 aps connected to it. I would like to have an SSID with only a 300Mbps connection that computers can connect and and SSID with a 150 Mbps connection that phones, printers etc can connect.

Btw, I could not find the wireless card properties to use 5GHz, so if you could find a solution as I wrote above, that would be great.

VIP Purple

Re: 802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

Hi Tibet,

 I could not find the wireless card properties to use 5GHz, so if you could find a solution as I wrote above, that would be great.

If you are using windows OS, then you can configure your wireless NIC to prefer 5GHz over 2.4GHz. Here is how you set it  on windows 7 ( Control Pannel -> Network & Internet -> Network Connection -> Wireless Network Connection -> Properties [right-mouse-click] -> Configure -> Advanced -> Preferred band)

Intel-N6205.PNG

HTH

Rasika

**** Pls rate all useful resposnes ****    

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: 802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

5ghz only ssid using 802.11n = up to 300mbps

2.4 only ssid using 802.11n = up to 144mbps

So create 2 SSID's and only allow 802.11a for the 300mbps ssid and only allow 802.11g for 144mbps ssid.

If you can't configure the wireless card properties, then this is what you need to do.

Sent from Cisco Technical Support iPhone App

-Scott
*** Please rate helpful posts ***
Community Member

Re: 802.11a/n/ac vs b/g/n

Both worked. One final question: I have noticed wavering in network speed when I enabled both signals (a and g) and created two SSIDs for each signal as opposed to when I used to have only the 5GHz signal enabled in the APs. The speed used to be stable at 300 Mbps when I had only the 5GHz signal enabled and now it is around 216 Mbps (and drops down easily). Would this be because of interference when I have both types of signals enabled? Or is it a temporary situation that would be gone once APs found the best channels?

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