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IDSM-2 using lots of memory

Hello.

I have question obout IDSM-2 which is using 98% of the memory.

Output from sh ver:

Using 1944629248 out of 1979682816 bytes of available memory (98% usage)

Using 4.3G out of 17G bytes of available disk space (27% usage)

It is normal that it is using 98% of memory durning normal operation or it is a problem ??

If it is not normal please tell me how i can trobuleshoot what is wrong with it.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Cisco Employee

Re: IDSM-2 using lots of memory

This message is misleading because it includes the memory allocated to system processes as well as memory allocated to the cache. Because cache

memory is really "free" memory; it is available for allocation at any time.

This is actually a cosmetic bug that you're running into.

If you want to check during periods of what you believe to be high memory usage, you can login as the service user

(if you have not created a service user you can do so via:

1. Log in to using the "cisco" account, the prompt will look like:

sensor#

2. Enter configure terminal mode:

sensor# configure terminal

3. Create the service account:

sensor(config)# username service privilege service password xxx

Then login to the sensor as the service user, and run the 'free' command. What 'sh ver' reports is the 'used' column.

The "Mem:" row, "used" column is the amount of memory (in kilobytes) that the "show version" command reports. However, this total includes the "cached" amount.

The formula for calculating the actual memory being used is:

((used - cached) / total) * 100 = percent of actual memory used.

1 REPLY
Cisco Employee

Re: IDSM-2 using lots of memory

This message is misleading because it includes the memory allocated to system processes as well as memory allocated to the cache. Because cache

memory is really "free" memory; it is available for allocation at any time.

This is actually a cosmetic bug that you're running into.

If you want to check during periods of what you believe to be high memory usage, you can login as the service user

(if you have not created a service user you can do so via:

1. Log in to using the "cisco" account, the prompt will look like:

sensor#

2. Enter configure terminal mode:

sensor# configure terminal

3. Create the service account:

sensor(config)# username service privilege service password xxx

Then login to the sensor as the service user, and run the 'free' command. What 'sh ver' reports is the 'used' column.

The "Mem:" row, "used" column is the amount of memory (in kilobytes) that the "show version" command reports. However, this total includes the "cached" amount.

The formula for calculating the actual memory being used is:

((used - cached) / total) * 100 = percent of actual memory used.

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