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New Member

Cisco Router for class B network

Hello to everybody, I'm so glad to join this community.

I'm planning a class B network, so I got few questions about:

-Which cisco router could be the best choice?

-Which class of Ip range to choice? I was thinking about 172.16.0.x with 4 subnets, 4096 host per subnet and host range starting from 172.16.0.x to 172.16.63.x Is a reliable choice for your opinion?

Thanks in advance

Emiliano

5 REPLIES
Silver

Cisco Router for class B network

Hi,

There is no correlation between router model and class of networks that you use. Router model choice should be based on throughput, interface types, performance, features required etc.

As for subnetting - it all depends on what you are trying to achieve. Decide how many subnets and how many hosts per subnet you need and go from there. A good subnet calculator will save you some time. I use this site:

http://www.subnetonline.com/pages/subnet-calculators/ip-subnet-calculator.php

New Member

Cisco Router for class B network

maybe I was not clear enough.

It's obvious there's any kind of relationship between router and ip mapping.

I just asked if someone has tried any Cisco router into class B networks to make my choice more clear!

Then I asked an explanation about ip mapping for a class B network, divided into 2 subnets. I need 4096 hosts per subnet.

I was thinking and calcuting 172.16.0.x with 255.255.0.0

Super Bronze

Re: Cisco Router for class B network

Disclaimer

The   Author of this posting offers the information contained within this   posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that   there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose.   Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not   be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of  this  posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.

Liability Disclaimer

In   no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including,   without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising  out  of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if  Author  has been advised of the possibility of such damage.

Posting

It's obvious there's any kind of relationship between router and ip mapping.

No it's really not obvious.  I agree with mfurnival.  Right now I work in an environment where we have routers from 871s up to 7600s all on the same class A network.  Router selection mainly depends on the "work", usually forwarding performance, requirement.  Size of the address space usually matters little to nothing.  Number of routes matters, but unless you're carrying all Internet routes, most modern L3 devices will easily handle the number of routes you're likely to have.

I need 4096 hosts per subnet.

4k hosts on a subnet is often too many due to broadcast scalability issues.  However, much depends on what the hosts are doing and what's the underlying physical network.  Usually you should be cautious exceeding a /24.  (Sometime even a /24 is too large too.)

New Member

Re: Cisco Router for class B network

It's a big wireless network for my town. I need 1000-2000 ip addresses for client's CPE.

Every node has 4 sectorial 5ghz antennas and 1 router for ip distribution.

One 1900 series is into my core network for WAN.

So what's your advice Joseph?

thanks in advance

Super Bronze

Re: Cisco Router for class B network

Disclaimer

The Author of this posting offers the information contained within this posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose. Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of this posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.

Liability Disclaimer

In no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including, without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising out of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if Author has been advised of the possibility of such damage.

Posting

Again, router (or perhaps a L3 switch) selection would be mostly based on expected work load and feature requirements.  Knowing there are 1k to 2k client addresses doesn't answer how many or likely to be actually live or how busy the each host will be.

Since you now mention using wireless, that can change things for sizing subnets.  In my environment we have both interior Enterprise wireless and external VPN clients.  Both use much larger subnet address blocks then we typically use for our wired host and both don't physically broadcast to other hosts on the same subnet.  Whether you wireless would be similar, I don't know.

I'm attaching a Cisco documents that discusses ISR performance under different usage conditions.

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