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New Member

Does ISR G2 router support etherchannel over integrated interfaces?

Hi All,

I remember I did that one time on 2800 router with Gi0/0 and Gi0/1 to connect another port channel in 3560G switch. I have no way to try it in ISR G2 router like 2900 or 3900 now. I know the the ethernet switch module must support it. I wonder if the integrated interfaces support it or not.

Thank you.

Lou

5 REPLIES
New Member

Does ISR G2 router support etherchannel over integrated interfac

Can anyone confirm whether the you can configure an etherchannel on the integrated interface on an ISR G2 router.

Neither of the links in the previous reply refer to an ISR G2 Router.

I have found that the enhanced etherswitch module supports Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) and Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) for automatic creation of EtherChannel links, but wanted to know if anyone has done it on an ISR!

Cheers

Colin

Hall of Fame Super Gold

Does ISR G2 router support etherchannel over integrated interfac

Neither of the links in the previous reply refer to an ISR G2 Router.

Neither of the links will have the words "ISR" or "ISR G2" but have you tried the commands?

I have and they work. 

New Member

Does ISR G2 router support etherchannel over integrated interfac

What model of router/version of IOS did you use?

I have been asked the question by a customer & don't currently have any devices to test this with!

Cheers

Colin

Hall of Fame Super Gold

Re: Does ISR G2 router support etherchannel over integrated inte

What model of router/version of IOS did you use?

It doesn't matter what IOS I am using because Layer 3 etherchannel (router) has been supported since the early days of 12.3 (if memory serves me correct).  And I am pretty certain you can't load that OLD IOS into an ISR G2.

Model?  I have tested Etherchannel on a 2921.

Not alot of people like to use Etherhchannel on a router (ANY router) because of the cost of the "real estate" of on-board Ethernet port.  The other reason is the single-point-of-failure is your router.  If your router fails, then that's it.

Now, please observe I'm deliberately not touching on the subject about "pushing MORE TRAFFIC into two or or more" Ethernet links.

The reason is because this is the "red line" as to what a router can/can't do.  I mean, sure, you can bundle two or more ethernet links and push traffic to both links.  That's not the argument.  The argument is this:  Can your router HANDLE the bandwidth? 

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