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Cisco Employee

Injecting Multicast Traffic into a Lab Network

Hi All,

I have a multicast feed that I want to inject into a lab network. The lab network is on a private net and therefore cannot see the RP. I'm not sure if this is possible, but the work around I'm looking at is forwarding the multicast traffic via "igmp static join". The next hop router would then be getting the traffic and I can use it as a source and assign it as a local RP. Would this workaround doable? If not, do you have any suggestions on how I can go about it? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

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Accepted Solutions
Cisco Employee

Re: Injecting Multicast Traffic into a Lab Network

John,

One more thing I forgot. You need to prevent RouterA to see RouterB as a PIM neighbor for the "ip igmp static-group" to work properly. You would do that by using the command "ip pim neighbor-filter ". This same command is also used in creating stub multicast network, which is somewhat what you want to do. In the example I attached, they show the downstream router (RouterB in your scenario) using the command "ip igmp helper-address", which is an alternative to using "ip igmp static-group" on the upstream router (RouterA).

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk828/technologies_tech_note09186a0080094821.shtml#stub

Regards

Harold Ritter
Sr. Technical Leader
CCIE 4168 (R&S, SP)
harold@cisco.com
México móvil: +52 1 55 8312 4915
Cisco México
Paseo de la Reforma 222
Piso 19
Cuauhtémoc, Juárez
Ciudad de México, 06600
México
5 REPLIES
Cisco Employee

Re: Injecting Multicast Traffic into a Lab Network

John,

This should work as traffic received by the lab router also acting as your local RP will be propagated to the rest of the lab as receivers joined the networks.

Regards

Harold Ritter
Sr. Technical Leader
CCIE 4168 (R&S, SP)
harold@cisco.com
México móvil: +52 1 55 8312 4915
Cisco México
Paseo de la Reforma 222
Piso 19
Cuauhtémoc, Juárez
Ciudad de México, 06600
México
Cisco Employee

Re: Injecting Multicast Traffic into a Lab Network

John,

Just one thing to keep in mind. Make sure that you have a static route pointing back at the receiver through the lab receiving interface and that you redistribute this route in the lab IGP to satisfy the RPF.

Regards

Harold Ritter
Sr. Technical Leader
CCIE 4168 (R&S, SP)
harold@cisco.com
México móvil: +52 1 55 8312 4915
Cisco México
Paseo de la Reforma 222
Piso 19
Cuauhtémoc, Juárez
Ciudad de México, 06600
México
Cisco Employee

Re: Injecting Multicast Traffic into a Lab Network

Thanks for the immediate answer. That's great to hear. I've been spending countless hours trying to get it to work, but at least I know it's a workable solution.

Also thanks for the heads up on the static route. I do have it configured. However, I'm still having problems getting it to work. Would like to check the configuration with you to see if I got it right.

I have routerA that connects to routerB, routerB is used as the local RP, and router A has a direct connection to the multicast feed and is using "igmp static join" on the interface that is connected to routerB. The rest of the lab network is behind routerB.

This is the configuration on routerB.

interface Loopback1

ip address 10.10.12.4 255.255.255.255

no ip directed-broadcast

ip pim sparse-mode

ip pim rp-address 10.10.12.4 override

Multicast traffic is not forwarding because it has been pruned. This is what I get when I do "sh ip mroute".

(*, 239.255.40.1), 00:30:25/stopped, RP 10.10.12.4, flags: SP

Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0

Outgoing interface list: Null

(4.65.1.2, 239.255.40.1), 00:02:27/00:00:36, flags: PT

Incoming interface: GigabitEthernet1/1/0, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0

Outgoing interface list: Null

I've also attached the "debug ip pim" log.

I'm at lost on this one. If you can point me to the right direction, that would be great. Thanks again for replying to my post.

Cisco Employee

Re: Injecting Multicast Traffic into a Lab Network

John,

One more thing I forgot. You need to prevent RouterA to see RouterB as a PIM neighbor for the "ip igmp static-group" to work properly. You would do that by using the command "ip pim neighbor-filter ". This same command is also used in creating stub multicast network, which is somewhat what you want to do. In the example I attached, they show the downstream router (RouterB in your scenario) using the command "ip igmp helper-address", which is an alternative to using "ip igmp static-group" on the upstream router (RouterA).

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk828/technologies_tech_note09186a0080094821.shtml#stub

Regards

Harold Ritter
Sr. Technical Leader
CCIE 4168 (R&S, SP)
harold@cisco.com
México móvil: +52 1 55 8312 4915
Cisco México
Paseo de la Reforma 222
Piso 19
Cuauhtémoc, Juárez
Ciudad de México, 06600
México
Cisco Employee

Re: Injecting Multicast Traffic into a Lab Network

Thanks Harold! It worked. Saves me further headache, not to mention countless hours of trying to figure it out.

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