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Migrating from Ripv2 to Eigrp

The network at my new employer is running RIPv2 and I would really like to get rid of it. What is the best way to migrate to EIGRP and what are some of the pit falls that I may encounter?

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Accepted Solutions
Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: Migrating from Ripv2 to Eigrp

Hello Michael,

there are no particular issues to take care of.

there are two possible approaches you can use.

a) Ships in the night with modified AD

Because EIGRP default AD is 90 < RIP's AD 120 adding an EIGRP process but this can be modified.

So the idea is to add the EIGRP process in the background with modified ADs (for internal, external and summary) so that routers still use RIP for routing.

At the end of this deployment you can compare the prefixes listed in the RIP database with the ones in the EIGRP with sh ip eigrp topology.

If the two DB match you can remove the modified ADs in EIGRP.

As a final step you can remove the ripv2 process from every router.

b) divide your network and redistribute

A different approach could be to that to divide your network in two parts.

You start to deploy EIGRP and remove RIPv2.

You define one or two boundary routers that will have both EIGRP and RIPv2 running and you can redistribute RIPv2 into EIGRP.

Note this approach is the only one that you can use if in your network there is non Cisco equipment because EIGRP is proprietary.

Initial EIGRP configuration can be just a copy of RIP's one, then if you have remote sites you can take advantage of the EIGRP stub feature on the remote routers.

You can also use the eigrp summary-address command on interfaces to send a summary (or more then one EIGRP allows this) towards the core.

How much you can summarize is dependent from your addressing plane.

Summarizing helps EIGRP in limiting the EIGRP queries range so it is part of good configuration of the protocol.

Hope to help

Giuseppe

2 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Bronze

Re: Migrating from Ripv2 to Eigrp

It's very hard to make a formal recommendation in a single post. This is a task designed for someone that needs to examine the entire network and look for dependencies on the current protocol.

Doing the changes in the router/switches in the easiest part.

You need to identify if there is redistribution in the network and address them for the EIGRP design.

You need to identify if all devices support EIGRP. You must remember, EIGRP is Cisco proprietary and only runs on Cisco devices.

That's just few of the things you need to think of. I highly recommend you hire a consulting company to make a formal assessment.

HTH,

__

Edison.

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: Migrating from Ripv2 to Eigrp

Hello Michael,

there are no particular issues to take care of.

there are two possible approaches you can use.

a) Ships in the night with modified AD

Because EIGRP default AD is 90 < RIP's AD 120 adding an EIGRP process but this can be modified.

So the idea is to add the EIGRP process in the background with modified ADs (for internal, external and summary) so that routers still use RIP for routing.

At the end of this deployment you can compare the prefixes listed in the RIP database with the ones in the EIGRP with sh ip eigrp topology.

If the two DB match you can remove the modified ADs in EIGRP.

As a final step you can remove the ripv2 process from every router.

b) divide your network and redistribute

A different approach could be to that to divide your network in two parts.

You start to deploy EIGRP and remove RIPv2.

You define one or two boundary routers that will have both EIGRP and RIPv2 running and you can redistribute RIPv2 into EIGRP.

Note this approach is the only one that you can use if in your network there is non Cisco equipment because EIGRP is proprietary.

Initial EIGRP configuration can be just a copy of RIP's one, then if you have remote sites you can take advantage of the EIGRP stub feature on the remote routers.

You can also use the eigrp summary-address command on interfaces to send a summary (or more then one EIGRP allows this) towards the core.

How much you can summarize is dependent from your addressing plane.

Summarizing helps EIGRP in limiting the EIGRP queries range so it is part of good configuration of the protocol.

Hope to help

Giuseppe

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