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Community Member

Qos question

Hi,

Can someone explain to me what these commands do? If the acl matches the traffic wil it mark the packets, even it is not for the route map?

ip local policy route-map DSCP

route-map DSCP permit 10

match IP address ACL

Set ip precedence network

Thanks

J.

4 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Blue

Re: Qos question

Jorg

"ip local policy route-map DSCP" means this route-map is being applied to packets generated by the router itself ie. the "local" keyword.

"set ip precedence network"

set the IP precedence value to 7. 6 & 7 are used to prioritize network protocols such as routing updates etc.

"If the acl matches the traffic wil it mark the packets, even it is not for the route map? "

Not sure what you mean by this. Packets will only be marked if they match the acl which is referenced by the route-map.

Jon

Community Member

Re: Qos question

Hi Jon,

In our situation it marks an ip range en it set the precedence to network. is it possible that when the traffic hits the access lists it will be marked as network traffic Q7, even it is not used in the route map. (i don't think so, just checking).

Jorg

Hall of Fame Super Blue

Re: Qos question

Jorg

I don't think i understand what you are asking to be honest.

If a route-map references an acl and is applied on a particular interface then any traffic on that interface that is matched by the acl will have the route-map set clause applied.

If traffic matches the acl but is on an interface that doesn't have the route-map applied then no that traffic will not be marked.

Jon

Community Member

Re: Qos question

Thanks Jon,

That is what I was thinking.

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