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New Member

Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

Hello everyone, I am building my own network at home and need some guidance

could you tell me how to redistribute RIP into EIGRP, the network at home I set up is using a the 10.10.10.0 255.255.255.0 IP and subnet and on the internet facing side of the router it uses RIP on network 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 the default gateway for the internet is 192.168.1.254, I am using NAT as well on the internet facing router to translate the 10.10.10.0 to 192.168.1.1. How can I redistribute the networks learned by RIP into the EIGRP network?

Any Thoughts???

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

Shane

Redistribution of RIP into EIGRP is not so difficult. The main thing to remember is that when you redistribute into a protocol you usually need to define a default metric. So redistribution of RIP into EIGRP might look something like this:

router eigrp 1

redistribute rip 10000 100 200 50 1500

This will redistribute the routes learned by RIP into EIGRP.

HTH

Rick

Hall of Fame Super Blue

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

Shane

EIGRP can use 5 different metrics when it selects routes although by default bandwidth and delay are the only 2 used.

See attached link for more details -

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk365/technologies_tech_note09186a00800c2d96.shtml#eigrpbasics

Jon

7 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

Shane

Redistribution of RIP into EIGRP is not so difficult. The main thing to remember is that when you redistribute into a protocol you usually need to define a default metric. So redistribution of RIP into EIGRP might look something like this:

router eigrp 1

redistribute rip 10000 100 200 50 1500

This will redistribute the routes learned by RIP into EIGRP.

HTH

Rick

New Member

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

cool I will try this thanks a mil.

New Member

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

Hi what does the 10000 100 200 50 1500 mean in the command??

Hall of Fame Super Blue

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

Shane

EIGRP can use 5 different metrics when it selects routes although by default bandwidth and delay are the only 2 used.

See attached link for more details -

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk365/technologies_tech_note09186a00800c2d96.shtml#eigrpbasics

Jon

New Member

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

Hello, what does the input 10000 100 200 50 1500 mean in the command

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

hello Shane,

all those parameters are there to provide the metric components to calculate the seed metric: the metric that EIGRP will associate to prefixes imported from RIP in this case.

EIGRP requires an explicit configuration of the seed metric you can do it in a separate line command with default-metric 10000 100 200 50 1500 or as Rick suggested in the redistribute command.

The difference is that using default-metric it can be used by multiple redistribute statements.

Without defining a seed metric no RIP prefix would be imported in EIGRP so it is a necessary step in redistributing into EIGRP.

Hope to help

Giuseppe

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: Redistribute RIP into EIGRP network

Shane

As Jon and Giuseppe have pointed out EIGRP needs 5 parameters as part of its route advertisement and calculation of metrics. For redistributed routes you typically need to supply those 5 parameters. If you are interested in the meaning of the parameters here they are:

10000 represents a figure for bandwidth

100 represents a figure for delay

200 represents a figure for reliability

50 represents a figure for load

1500 represents a figure for MTU.

It is not particularly important what specific values you use. I like to use figures that would be typical for a moderately attractive route. I have seen configs where people used a default that represented a very attractive route (very high bandwidth, very low delay, very high reliability, very low load) and that works also.

HTH

Rick

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