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Server switch 2960s versus 3750s

On a site with about 300 users (factory 24 hours on 7 days a week) we will establish a new Cisco based network. As backbone switches we want to stack in the DataCenter and the

Backup room 2 3750G-12S to each other. We have about 60 servers in total (together in both rooms) and the question is now should we use a 2960 (48 port) switch as server switch in each room and connect it to the backbone stacked 3750s via Gigabit-Channel or should we plan for each room a 3750 with 48 ports and stack them to the other two 3750s (the backbone). We plan L3 only on the backbone 3750s, not on the server switches. - Any advice is welcome.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Super Bronze

Re: Server switch 2960s versus 3750s

For inter unit bandwidth, less device management, and reduncancy, I too suggest stacking.

One issue to note is the 3750 licensing issue. If I understand it correctly, the original 3750 series allows for mixed feature licenses within a stack. The whole stack will effectively run the most featured image. If the unit with that image fails, you'll lose the features of that image unless another unit in the stack also has that image. So far so good, but if go to upgrade your stack, all units will be updated with the newer image which will likely put you out of license compliance.

What I've seen done to avoid this problem is a L3 stack (if running beyond the non base image) and a L2 stack (running the base image). The two stacks are then connected with a multichannel port groups across different stack members.

2 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Bronze

Re: Server switch 2960s versus 3750s

Stack them. You are going from 1Gbps with the 2960 solution to 32Gbps with the 3750 solution. If you plan on purchasing the 3750E, you can get 64Gbps backplane speed when using the stackwise cable.

HTH,

__

Edison.

Super Bronze

Re: Server switch 2960s versus 3750s

For inter unit bandwidth, less device management, and reduncancy, I too suggest stacking.

One issue to note is the 3750 licensing issue. If I understand it correctly, the original 3750 series allows for mixed feature licenses within a stack. The whole stack will effectively run the most featured image. If the unit with that image fails, you'll lose the features of that image unless another unit in the stack also has that image. So far so good, but if go to upgrade your stack, all units will be updated with the newer image which will likely put you out of license compliance.

What I've seen done to avoid this problem is a L3 stack (if running beyond the non base image) and a L2 stack (running the base image). The two stacks are then connected with a multichannel port groups across different stack members.

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