Cisco Support Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Announcements

Welcome to Cisco Support Community. We would love to have your feedback.

For an introduction to the new site, click here. And see here for current known issues.

Stacking of switches

                   What is meant by stacking in switches how to do that.

I  have checked one of my cisco switch it having ports of 104 Port( Gig1/0/1---Gig1/052 and gig 2/0/1 ...... gig2/0/52). i thought it was 104 port switches. But they said it was 52 port switch which was stacked of 2 52 Port switches. Need information regarding this concept ?

1 REPLY
Super Bronze

Re: Stacking of switches

Disclaimer

The   Author of this posting offers the information contained within this   posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that   there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose.   Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not   be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of  this  posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.

Liability Disclaimer

In   no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including,   without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising  out  of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if  Author  has been advised of the possibility of such damage.

Posting

In depends.  One older usage of "stacking" switches, often meant to daisy-chain or cascade connect them.  E.g. sw1 <> sw2 <> sw3 <> sw4

If the switches support STP, you might also connect them in a ring, i.e. in the prior example, sw1 would also connect to the last switch, sw4.

The interconnections between such stacked switches was usually on "normal" ports, but Cisco also had for some of their switches "special" stack cables that could be used, e.g. GigaStack - see http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps607/products_tech_note09186a00800a2cac.shtml.

In some later Cisco switches, Cisco provided a new "kind" of stack.  Starting with the original 3750/3750G series, Cisco provided StackWise stacking, see http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/switches/ps5718/ps5023/prod_white_paper09186a00801b096a.html.

What made StackWise different, the "stacked" devices functioned as one logical device.  Cisco has subsequently provided StackWisePlus (3750E/3750X), FlexStack (2960S), FlexStack-Plus (2960X) (see http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/switches/ps5718/ps12995/white_paper_c11-728327.pdf) and StackWise-480 (3850) that also have all the stacked devices function as one logical device.

123
Views
0
Helpful
1
Replies
CreatePlease login to create content