Cisco Support Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Community Member

To stackwise or not to stackwise...that is the question!

Hi yall!

I just finished configuring two 3750 switches that will be living in our server rack. These switches will be housing about 10 VLANs propagating via VTP v3. I have two trunks between these two switches that are setup in a port-channel and everything and routing great. Also, all of my VLAN interfaces are running HSRP for redundancy between the switches.

With this configuration, would I gain anything by hooking up the stackwise cables? From my reading, it sounds like it helps with configuring a stack as one switch but since I am configuring them individually does this even matter?

The last time I had worked on Cisco gear, there were no stackwise cables so I don't want to hook them up and break my configurations. Conversely though, I don't want to miss out on any functionality if there is some cool stuff I am unaware of.

Thanks in advance for the helpful responses.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
VIP Super Bronze

To stackwise or not to stackwise...that is the question!

James,

When switches are stacked (maximum 9) they are logically one switch, you only configure the master and the master sync the config to all the members. The other benefit of stacking in the server farm would be, if you are connecting your server using 2 NICs to two different switches that are stacked.  So, if one switch fails the second switch will take over without any down time.  In your case, since everything is working and you have HSRP running, I don't see a whole a lot of benefits in changing your config.

HTH

2 REPLIES
VIP Super Bronze

To stackwise or not to stackwise...that is the question!

James,

When switches are stacked (maximum 9) they are logically one switch, you only configure the master and the master sync the config to all the members. The other benefit of stacking in the server farm would be, if you are connecting your server using 2 NICs to two different switches that are stacked.  So, if one switch fails the second switch will take over without any down time.  In your case, since everything is working and you have HSRP running, I don't see a whole a lot of benefits in changing your config.

HTH

Super Bronze

To stackwise or not to stackwise...that is the question!

Disclaimer

The    Author of this posting offers the information contained within this    posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that    there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any  purpose.   Information provided is for informational purposes only and  should not   be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind.  Usage of  this  posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.

Liability Disclaimer

In    no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever  (including,   without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or  profit) arising  out  of the use or inability to use the posting's  information even if  Author  has been advised of the possibility of such  damage.

Posting

Additional benefits of using Stackwise (or Stackwise+), besides what Reza already described: more bandwidth between your switches (either dual 8 or 16 Gbps duplex links), frees normal ports, don't have to concern yourself with port channeling load imbalance, optimal link usage (vs. HSRP) and supports multiple chassis ethernetchannels.

162
Views
0
Helpful
2
Replies
CreatePlease to create content