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Totally confused with Ethernet, 10base5,10base,2, 10BaseT, 100baseXX ..

      Totally confused with Ethernet, 10base5,10base,2, 10BaseT, 100baseXX ..

What is the relation between Ethernet and 10baseX, 100BaseX, 1000BaseX ?

I know that Ethernet is a layer2 lan technology and 10baseX/100BaseX is the physical media type. Am i correct ?

And the main thing that i wanna know is, what is the realtion between those ?

Regards,

Chandu

Regards, Chandu
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions

Totally confused with Ethernet, 10base5,10base,2, 10BaseT, 100ba

Hello Chandu,

The difference of 10BASE-T, 100BASE-T and 1000BASE-T. 10BASE-T is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 10 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running Ethernet on this cabling.


100BASE-T is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 100 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running baseband Ethernet on this cabling.


1000BASE-T (also called gigabit Ethernet) is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 1000 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running baseband Ethernet on this cabling.

Please rate the helpfull posts.

Regards,

Naidu.

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Totally confused with Ethernet, 10base5,10base,2, 10BaseT, 100ba

Chandu

As Naidu has explained the various standards (10base5,10base,2, 10BaseT, etc) are primarily oriented to the various physical media and how to run the layer 2 Ethernet protocol on the various media. The Ethernet protocol has remained fairly constant over the various media and describes how to use MAC addresses for addressing on the local link, using ARP to associate layer 3 IP addresses with layer 2 MAC addresses, specifies the format of the layer 2 frame, how to identify the upper layer protocol that is being transported, etc. Most of these have remained fairly constant over the various media. Some other parts of the Ethernet protocol have evolved. For example on the 10Base protocols where all devices were connected on a common wire it was important to have the collision detection capability. As media evolved and we transitioned to twisted pair (and fiber) there is a pair for transmitting and a pair for receiving and it is possible to transmit at the same time that we receive and collision detection became much less important.

So the relationship that you need to understand is about the various physical media and how they work and how they change vs the layer 2 Ethernet protocol with its framing and addressing etc which remains relatively constant.

HTH

Rick

2 REPLIES

Totally confused with Ethernet, 10base5,10base,2, 10BaseT, 100ba

Hello Chandu,

The difference of 10BASE-T, 100BASE-T and 1000BASE-T. 10BASE-T is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 10 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running Ethernet on this cabling.


100BASE-T is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 100 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running baseband Ethernet on this cabling.


1000BASE-T (also called gigabit Ethernet) is the IEEE standard that defines the requirement for sending information at 1000 Mbps on unshielded twisted-pair cabling, and defines various aspects of running baseband Ethernet on this cabling.

Please rate the helpfull posts.

Regards,

Naidu.

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Totally confused with Ethernet, 10base5,10base,2, 10BaseT, 100ba

Chandu

As Naidu has explained the various standards (10base5,10base,2, 10BaseT, etc) are primarily oriented to the various physical media and how to run the layer 2 Ethernet protocol on the various media. The Ethernet protocol has remained fairly constant over the various media and describes how to use MAC addresses for addressing on the local link, using ARP to associate layer 3 IP addresses with layer 2 MAC addresses, specifies the format of the layer 2 frame, how to identify the upper layer protocol that is being transported, etc. Most of these have remained fairly constant over the various media. Some other parts of the Ethernet protocol have evolved. For example on the 10Base protocols where all devices were connected on a common wire it was important to have the collision detection capability. As media evolved and we transitioned to twisted pair (and fiber) there is a pair for transmitting and a pair for receiving and it is possible to transmit at the same time that we receive and collision detection became much less important.

So the relationship that you need to understand is about the various physical media and how they work and how they change vs the layer 2 Ethernet protocol with its framing and addressing etc which remains relatively constant.

HTH

Rick

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