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Digital Networking

1.) How many sites can be networked together? Is there a limit?<br><br>2.) When addressing a message to a remote subscriber, is the name played back for verification?<br><br>3.) Can subscribers who send messages to remote subscribers find out whether those messages have been delivered? And later, that they have been accessed?<br><br>4.) Can pre-defined lists include local and remote subscribers? Limits to this?<br><br>5.) If a subscribers name or extension number changes and is updated on the home system, does this change automatically get updated on remote systems?<br><br>6.) Are calls between systems 1 or 2 way in nature? (AMIS is one way...)<br><br>7.) Do we lose features when networking? (IE, can't mark messages private, urgent, etc.)<br><br>

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Anonymous
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Re: Digital Networking

Hey Chris. Lets see if we can knock these down. I have a rather long but not too dry document on network addressing I can send you if you're interested in some light reading on the subject, by the way. It's around 25 pages (with lots of groovy pictures) that covers some Exchange networking basics and how we leverage those and other addressing options in our product. Let me know if you want to give it a read and I'll send it your way.

>>How many sites can be networked together? Is there a limit?

No, there’s no limit.

>>When addressing a message to a remote subscriber, is the name played back for verification?

You bet. There’s several ways to address to remote users, so it depends on how you choose to set it up. If you have the Exchange sites connected using a Site Connector, the voice names are replicated in the directory as part of that process. When you address to a user at a location we pull the voice name out of the directory and play it back as confirmation. If, instead, you’re using SMTP to route messages between sites (in which case the directory is not being replicated between the sites) you can use Internet Subscriber as proxy users and record voice names for them. In this case outside callers can also find them in the directory, you can set them up for transfers, greetings etc… just like a regular subscriber, however when a message is left for them it’s routed via SMTP it’s destination instead of having Exchange get it there using the MTA. You can also setup “blind addressing” in which you can enter the location ID followed by the subscriber’s extension at that location and the message is delivered. In this last case we can’t play a voice name of the subscriber, of course, but we can play the voice name of the site if you’ve set it up. So if you addressed to, say, “2061189” which breaks down into site 206 and user 1189 in this case, you’d hear “extension 1189 at Active Voice Seattle” as the confirmation name.

In short, you got options. Depending on which of them you decide to use (or if you choose to mix them) the answers to your questions will vary. Most folk decide to use the connected site model since it’s cool and is how most Exchange customers will have their stuff setup anyway.

>>Can subscribers who send messages to remote subscribers find out whether those messages have been delivered? And later, that they have been accessed?

If you’re addressing to a connected site (i.e. Exchange is replicating the directory between the two sites), you can ask for a return receipt just like leaving a voice mail for a local user. Obviously blind addressing and addressing to Internet Subscribers don’t have that option.

>>Can pre-defined lists include local and remote subscribers? Limits to this?

Sure. A Distribution List can contain any users in the directory which include remote users at connected sites or Internet Subscribers. No limits on this (other than perhaps the limit Exchange might impose on the number of entries in a distribution list, but I don’t know of one).

>>If a subscribers name or extension number changes and is updated on the home system, does this change automatically get updated on remote systems?

Yes. This is one of the advantages we have using Exchange as our message store (i.e. a true unified model). We store this information in the directory and when it changes, Exchange replicates it around to all the sites you’re connected to. Once it's replicated, the Unity servers in the remote sites can address using the new extension number without you having to do anything. Very nice.

>>Are calls between systems 1 or 2 way in nature? (AMIS is one way...)

Addressing to a user at a connected site is just like addressing to a local user. They can reply, you can get receipts etc… If you’re using blind addressing, it’s one way of course. Same deal with using Internet Subscribers... typically they are used to get messages to a different mail store (i.e. a POP3 mailbox off site somewhere) so getting receipts back would not be possible.

>>Do we lose features when networking? (IE, can't mark messages private, urgent, etc.)

When addressing in the connected sites model, there’s no loss of functionality at all. You have all the messaging and receipts options you do messaging to local users. When doing blind addressing or addressing to Internet Subscribers you don’t have the option to set messages to be private, urgent, get a return receipt etc…


Jeff Lindborg
Unity Product Architect
Active Voice Corp
jlindborg@activevoice.com

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