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New Member

Route Pattern

Is there any reason to or not to use 9.@. I had a class that the instructor pushed 9.@ THen my phone installer just called him an idiot. I asked him why and he couldn't tell me.

13 REPLIES
Cisco Employee

Re: Route Pattern

Well, if the phone installer cannot explain, you have to wonder. 9.@ is a catchall - if you are going to put all the route patterns in explicitly, you are bound to miss one. You wouldn't want unavailable route pattern to be the one the boss uses.

New Member

Re: Route Pattern

My opinion would be to use 9.@ then setup the patterns that you dont want. Seems easier to me. Out installer is 9.011! He said the was the pattern cisco recommends. I am not trying to get in a huge debate I am just trying to figure which one is better and what everyone else is using

Re: Route Pattern

Note that 9.@ is a macro which expands to multiple route patterns. So its an easy way to match many calls, using one pattern and a lot of people prefer using it. If an admin wants to restrict outbound calling, he can prefer not to use 9.@ and use individual patterns. This will make your call routing table big. With the proper use of 9.@ and route filters, you can still restrict dial out to a greater extent.

Like Hinho mentioned...its possible that if you configure individual RP's, you are very likely to miss one and provide denial of service.

Cisco Employee

Re: Route Pattern

Not to add any confusion here but.... I have seen where customers use the 9.@ in combination with Route Filters and have unexpected results. The problem was that they did not understand fully how the route filters work and what what patterns would be included/excluded with the filters. Once they understood the affect of the filters then all was good. So if you go this route just make sure you understand how the filters are working.

You can use the Cisco Dialed Number Analyzer to look at the Route patterns that will be used by CCM. Choose the Analysis > Dump DA Information option and select the Dialing Forest. This will list each pattern that will be loaded into the CallManager's Dialing Forest memory by partition. You will be able to see how changing the Route Filters will affect the Dialing Forest.

Kevin

New Member

Re: Route Pattern

I do not plan on changing our route patterns anytime soon unless we start to have issues. At this point in time I am not educated enough on this system to make that call. I have only attended the basic ccm and unity class. However, my plan is to get my ccna and my certs for call manager and what ever else there is. I was told by a couple different people that my system has the most complicated installation and configuration they have ever set up or seen. I don't know why they say this. We are running 12 different companies, ipc express, ip celerate. We are also going to connect another ccm that is remote that is running about 50 users and then we are going to start hosting other companies thru our ccm. How does this compare to everyone else's cisco system?

New Member

Re: Route Pattern

9.@ is great for simple configurations, but in more complex multi-site environments where you have to send local or 911 calls out of specific gateways at remote sites, or when you have multiple PRIs using some for LD only and some for local calls etc, 9.@ becomes very restrictive. What I have found works well is to create a group of partitions for each site, 911 LD Local etc and create route patterns for each site 911 (emergency dialing) 9.911(emergency dialing) 9.[2-9]XXXXX (7 digit) 9.1[2-9]XXXXXXXXX 9.011XXXXXXXXXXXXX 9.011XXXXXXXXXXXXXX etc and assign them the partition for that site. I then create a calling search space per site and include that site's patitions.

Another issue you run into with 9.@ is the interdigit time out. If telco permits 7 digit dialing, users will have to wait for the interdigit time out to expire before CallManager decides the user is done dialing.

New Member

Re: Route Pattern

The way 9.@ was explained to me is it didn't cause interdigit timeout. So my understanding is use 9.@ for less complex systems and use 9. what ever for everything else. Is this a correct assumption?

Silver

Re: Route Pattern

There is a good discussion of this issue in the Troubleshooting Cisco IP Telephony book. The @ actually calls up the whole collection of patterns that are in the NANP, you can actually look at this whole thing in C:\Program Files\Cisco\DialPlan\NANP. You can use route filters to modify it, but you need to really study what all the tags do, etc. For very straightforward installs, it is probably fine, but many situations end up with complicating factors. We usually do as described above, with a set of patterns in different partitions for each location. The System Guide has some good info:

Using the @ Wildcard Character in Route Patterns

Using the @ wildcard character in a route pattern provides a single route pattern to match all NANP numbers, and requires additional consideration.

The number 92578912 matches both of the following route patterns: 9.@ and 9.XXXXXXX. Even though both these route patterns seem to equally match the address, the 9.@ route pattern actually provides the closest match. The @ wildcard character encompasses many different route patterns, and one of those route patterns is [2-9][02-9]XXXXX. Because the number 2578912 more closely matches [2-9][02-9]XXXXX than it does XXXXXXX, the 9.@ route pattern provides the closest match for routing.

When configuring route patterns, take the following considerations into account:

•When @ is used in a routing pattern, the system recognizes octothorpe (#) automatically as an end-of-dialing character for international calls. For routing patterns that do not use @, you must include the # in the routing pattern to be able to use the # character to signal the end of dialing.

•If the route pattern contains an at symbol (@), the Discard Digits field can specify any discard digits instructions (DDIs).

The "Special Characters and Settings" section lists DDIs and describes the effects of applying each DDI to a dialed number.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps556/products_administration_guide_chapter09186a00803edabe.html#wp1050657

And the Admin Guide

Route Filter Tag Descriptions

The tag serves as the core component of a route filter. A tag applies a name to a subset of the dialed-digit string. For example, the NANP number 972-555-1234 comprises LOCAL-AREA-CODE (972), OFFICE-CODE (555), and SUBSCRIBER (1234) route filter tags.

Route filter tags require operators and can require additional values to decide which calls are filtered.

The values for route filter tag fields can contain the wildcard characters X, *, #, [, ], -, ^, and the numbers 0 through 9. (See Table 15-3 in the "Special Characters and Settings" section of the Cisco CallManager System Guide for definitions of wildcard characters.) The descriptions in Table 15-2 use the notations [2-9] and XXXX to represent actual digits. In this notation, [2-9] represents any single digit in the range 2 through 9, and X represents any single digit in the range 0 through 9. Therefore, the description "The three-digit area code in the form [2-9]XX" means that you can enter the actual digits 200 through 999, or all wildcards, or any mixture of actual digits and wildcards that results in a pattern with that range.

Route filter tags vary depending on the numbering plan that you choose from the Numbering Plan drop-down list box on the Route Filter Configuration window. Table 15-2 describes the route filter tags for the North American Numbering Plan.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps556/products_administration_guide_chapter09186a00803ed67d.html#wp1032663

And even this old tech note

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps556/products_tech_note09186a0080094b2a.shtml

Mary Beth

Cisco Employee

Re: Route Pattern

I've always been a big fan of the 9.@ route pattern. There is difficulty in creating the correct filter for 7 digit calls however (the old default 7 digit RF doesn't cover enough) so for 7 digit calls a static route pattern works well. You do NOT get interdigit timeout with 9.@ if administered correctly with Route Filters. With 9.@ you get more digit modification 'macros' as Mary Beth notes (11/10-7 digits, 11-10 digits, etc.). With 9.@ you can use a single route pattern to cover all toll free numbers - 800, 855, 866, 877, 888. There's no other way to do this. With 9.@ you can have a single 'deny' route pattern that includes 900 area codes, the 976 office code in any area code, and any other restricted numbers. With 9.@ you can use 2 route patterns (due to the number of area codes) to cover all international (including Canada, Mexico, Dominican Republic, etc.). Check http://docs.nanpa.com/cgi-bin/npa_reports/nanpa?function=list_npa_geo_location for all the international area codes. You can even include Alaska and Hawaii as international in the same pattern if desired (some do because of the increased LD rates). You would need almost 50 route patterns to do this otherwise. With 9.@ CallManager correctly sets the ISDN plan and type on the call - static patterns send everything as unknown/unknown or whatever you statically define in the gateway.

As I said, I'm a big fan :-)

Don

Blue

Re: Route Pattern

If you have a site that has 7 digit local dialing and 10 digit local dialing (no direct dial access code of 1) is it possible to have two route patterns of 9.@ with appropriate 7 and 10 digit route filters AND not have to adjust the interdigit timeout field?

New Member

Re: Route Pattern

Hi,

9.@ is the most widely used route pattern. "@" represents the full NANP (North American Numbering Pattern). So, if you are using that pattern, then you can make use of all the dialling plans in the US.

The best way is to use route filters along with the 9.@ pattern.

As mentioned by your phone installer, 9.011! is a pattern which is used for International calls. It is not one we use for local or long distance calls in the US.

Incase of any questions let me know.

Blue

Re: Route Pattern

Replied by: adignan - Network Voice Engineer, Berbee Information Networks Corp. - Nov 4, 2005, 7:25am PST

If you have a site that has 7 digit local dialing and 10 digit local dialing (no direct dial access code of 1) is it possible to have two route patterns of 9.@ with appropriate 7 and 10 digit route filters AND not have to adjust the interdigit timeout field?

New Member

Re: Route Pattern

Of course you can. As mentioned, the 7-digit Route Pattern is easiest with 9.XXXXXXX, but for the 10-digit, you can make a Route Filter with multiple entries of "Local-Area-Code= 645" (for instance). Make sure that you insert separate clauses for each area code to be covered in the 10-digit local calls, then make a Route Pattern that leverages this filter. Works great!

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