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Community Member

BGP and VLAN router spec

Hello,

We are looking to purchase two routers and was hoping that you maybe to advise on the specification.

We have a 10Mbit ethernet connection to one of our ISP's which we will use eBGP to connect to. We have to connect to them over a VLAN (as it's via a peering exchange point). This is at location A.

At location B we have another 10Mbit connection to our second ISP which we will connect to again via eBGP.

We will also run a 10Mbit (VLAN) connection between location A and B.

I was looking to purchase two 2691 routers to do this job, one for each location. Would these routers be up to the job, or would you recommend any other kit for this?

Many Thanks in advance,

Matt.

4 REPLIES
Bronze

Re: BGP and VLAN router spec

2691s sound good unless you're planning on taking full BGP routing tables from your providers, which doesn't sound necessary with 1 router at each site.

Community Member

Re: BGP and VLAN router spec

Many Thanks.

Would there be any advantages of taking full routes from the two ISP's, that are worth me upgrading to high spec routers? (I'm keeping cost in mind!)

Also, would I need any additional IOS updates to be able to run an 802.1q VLAN between the ISP and our router at site A?

Best Regards,

Matt.

Bronze

Re: BGP and VLAN router spec

Usually you take full BGP routing tables when you have multiple ISP links at a single site, either to load-balance outbound traffic between ISPs based on which ISP has a better route to a given destination, or to provide failover at the prefix level rather than the link level. (If ISP-A loses its route to a given network, it will withdraw that route from your BGP table so that you know to send traffic destined to that network to the other ISP. When using only a default route to each ISP, your router will never know about such a failure -- it only knows when the default route is withdrawn by the ISP or, more often, when the link itself goes down.)

So, given that you only have a single router/ISP link at each site, you probably don't need to accept full BGP tables. But it depends on what (if any) failover/load-balancing stuff you're doing. I see now, however, that 2691s can handle 256MB of memory (128MB is the limit for the rest of the 2600 series), so taking a full BGP table from each ISP shouldn't be a problem actually.

As for 802.1q trunking, generally you need an IP Plus version of IOS to do this, which is a step up from the standard IP builds. You can use Feature Navigator (http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/Support/FeatureNav/FN.pl) to confirm.

Community Member

Re: BGP and VLAN router spec

Again, Many Thanks for your help.

I have checked with the Feature Navigator and some 802.1q functionality is included with the IP Base IOS, but the Plus IOS is needed for the full feature set.

Right, looks like i'm off to purchase two 2691 routers now! (and the services of a freelance Cisco tech to go with them!).

Best Regards,

Matt.

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