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Cat6 AC power supply

Have a question concerning Cat6 AC power supply. The Cat6 that I'll be deploying will require 2500W AC power, due to insertion of not just switching but fabric and service modules (IDS, NAM), which require commander socket rated at 16A and 240V. My question is, the power socket outlet provided are rated at 240V with 30A. That's 14A overcurrent, would this work? What the effects like? A friend of mine say that this would work, since the PS on Cat6, will basically regulate the power anyway. However, not being trained as an electrical engineer, I'm still skeptic. Need you guys help on this to confirm. Btw, what if the situation in vice versa? Is there a website out there for this power thingy you can point me to? Apreciate the help, thanks.

3 REPLIES

Re: Cat6 AC power supply

The overcurrent is not a problem. It will just take longer for the mains-fuse to blow. The power supply will regulate it's output, no problem here.

What should worry you a bit is that you are going to run one power supply at nearly its maximum rating. In this way you can expect it to die relatively young. If your budget allows for it, buy an extra 2500W power supply and let them share the load.

Regards,

Leo

New Member

Re: Cat6 AC power supply

Thanks for the confirmation, though I'm not that comfortable with the "It will just take longer for the mains-fuse to blow" bit, ;-). Btw, yes the box will be using two 2500W power supply runing load sharing.

Rgds

Helme

Bronze

Re: Cat6 AC power supply

From what I know about electrial things, when you connect something up to an electrical socket it "pulls" X amount of amps. The circuit isn't "pushing" the amount of amps it is rated for toward the gear. The gear is "pulling" the current over the wire. When a socket is rated at 30A that means it can support device(s) "pulling" up to 30A total of current off of it. Any more "pull" than that and a breaker will trip/fuse will blow because the wiring may burn up if > 30 amps going through it.

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