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New Member

Catalyst 3560

I am considering adding a Catalyst 3560 to my network to run IP phones. I am a small business owner and not too hip on switches. I have about 15 phones to add to our existing network. I am looking at just getting a 24 port switch to handle the phones and keeping my data on an existing switch. The other option is to buy a 48 port switch for all of my devices. What do I need to consider?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Purple

Re: Catalyst 3560

It comes down to whether or not you want to put all your eggs in one basket. It is a matter of trade-offs:

One switch:

- easier managability

- only one device to maintain

Two switches:

- if one goes down, you don't lose everything

- you could spread your critical devices over the two

- you now have two switches to maintain and manage

There aren't any clear advantages either way, it's your call really...

Paresh

3 REPLIES
Purple

Re: Catalyst 3560

When using IP phones, one of the important things to consider is, of course, the issue of Power over Ethernet. The 3560 does support both IEEE 802.3af and Cisco prestandard Power over Ethernet.

I would also consider the QoS abilities of the switch which is a critical issue when you have voice and data traffic competing for the same bandwidth.

Hope that helps - pls rate the post if it does.

Paresh

New Member

Re: Catalyst 3560

I am aware of both QoS and PoE requirements, which is why I am adding the 3560 to my network. My specific question is whether there will be any advantages to going with a single 48 port for all my computers, printers, etc. or should I save the money and just buy the smaller 24 port model for my phones?

Purple

Re: Catalyst 3560

It comes down to whether or not you want to put all your eggs in one basket. It is a matter of trade-offs:

One switch:

- easier managability

- only one device to maintain

Two switches:

- if one goes down, you don't lose everything

- you could spread your critical devices over the two

- you now have two switches to maintain and manage

There aren't any clear advantages either way, it's your call really...

Paresh

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