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New Member

Daisy chaining Switches

I have 7 C2950T-24 10/100/1000 in my network, what

is the best way to link them, Daisey chain or,run all

switches into one master switch using crossover cables, that is currently what I am doing, all our

server are also in the same top switch.

  • Other Network Infrastructure Subjects
6 REPLIES
New Member

Re: Daisy chaining Switches

The best way would to use the master (distribution) switch idea. If you daisy chain them and for example a switch near the center fails, all switches behind that lose connectivity to the switches ahead of the bad one. I would also work in some redundancy.

New Member

Re: Daisy chaining Switches

The best way would to use the master (distribution) switch idea. If you daisy chain them and for example a switch near the center fails, all switches behind that lose connectivity to the switches ahead of the bad one. I would also work in some redundancy.

New Member

Re: Daisy chaining Switches

The best way would to use the master (distribution) switch idea. If you daisy chain them and for example a switch near the center fails, all switches behind that lose connectivity to the switches ahead of the bad one. I would also work in some redundancy.

New Member

Re: Daisy chaining Switches

The best way would to use the master (distribution) switch idea. If you daisy chain them and for example a switch near the center fails, all switches behind that lose connectivity to the switches ahead of the bad one. I would also work in some redundancy.

New Member

Re: Daisy chaining Switches

The best way would to use the master (distribution) switch idea. If you daisy chain them and for example a switch near the center fails, all switches behind that lose connectivity to the switches ahead of the bad one. I would also work in some redundancy.

New Member

Re: Daisy chaining Switches

Hi,

If you connect all the remote switches to one master switch, then each remote switch has 1Gb/s uplink to the master switch, however this scenario means that your master switch becomes the focalpoint of your network and effectively becomes a single point of failure for your whole infrastructure - if the master fails, your whole network is broken.

You could use the daisychain method, but include a link from the last switch back to the first (in a big ring if you like), spanning-tree will automatically put one of the inter-switch link ports into a blocking state to prevent a loop, In this scenario - if any switch (or link) fails, the ring topology means that connectivity is still achieved to the remainder of the switches. - however, this topology means the whole stack of switches will share a 1Gb/s backone (2Gb/s can be achieved by using 2 links between switch configured as an Etherchannel bundle.

A Third option you have is to create 2 master switches with a link between them, and have a link from each remote switches to each of the master switches - this option uses the most number of switch ports to create the network backbone, but will offer 1gb/s uplink to the master switches - and provide master switch redundancy.

Hope this helps,

Rowan

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