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New Member

Ethernet throughput limitation

Hello.

When using Half-duplex 10Mbps ethernet connection :

1) What is the maximum operational throughput I can get working just one way at the same time?

2) What is the maximum operational throughput I can get working both ways at the same time?

When working Full-duplex 10Mbps - how do the above values change ?

Thank you.

4 REPLIES
New Member

Re: Ethernet throughput limitation

1) Half-Duplex 10Mbs theoretical - Full Duplex same answer: 10Mbs one direction

2) Half-duplex means you cannot trans/rec simultaniously. You can receive (again theoretical) up to 10Mbs or transmit @ 10Mbs. Full Duplex 20Mbs - Transmit + recieve simultaniously @ 10Mbs.

New Member

Re: Ethernet throughput limitation

Hello.

Thank you for the reply, but I think I didn't clearify myself enough.

I know that half-duplex = one way 10Mbps, but when trying to send data both directions at the same time, the CSMA/CD mechanism will take place and so the actual bandwidth is less than 10Mbps. My question is how much bandwidth I can assume in the situation when I have bidirectional attempts to transmit data on 10Mbps ethernet Half-duplex and Full-duplex.

Thank you.

New Member

Re: Ethernet throughput limitation

by the specs its about 3.7-4 mbps, at the range the theoretical number of collisions begins it increment exponentially and everything comes to a standstill, of course everyone has seen utilization at 70-80 percent but at these periods of time there are many multiple collisions.

Bronze

Re: Ethernet throughput limitation

Keep in mind that a lot of this depends on the upper layer protocols being used. If you're using TCP, you're not going to get close to 10Mbps (unidirectional) on a half-duplex 10Mbps link because the TCP ACKs going back to the sender will tend to collide with the data packets, lowering throughput significantly.

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