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Rebooting switches and routers

Is it a good practice to reboot your switches and routers periodically and is there anything gained by doing this??

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

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Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: Rebooting switches and routers

The only instance in which I would say this is unequivocally a good idea is one in which a known bug is causing, say, a memory leak which, uncorrected, will lead to a system crash. In that case, one would monitor memory usage and schedule preventitive maintenance reboots to forestall an unplanned outage.

Other than something like that, the practice of keeping one's IOS/CatOS relatively current (i.e., at least on a supported release) and analyzing new features for utility in your environment (or, more likely bug or vulnerability fixes) would more likely be the catalyst for introducing a new software version (and thus indirectly requiring a reboot to load the new code).

Hope this helps. Please rate it if it does.

2 REPLIES

Re: Rebooting switches and routers

Hello,

the first rule should be: Never touch a running system!

Second rule: If it´s not broken - don´t fix it!

Why would you like to reboot, if everything works fine? There are routers/switches with system uptime of years doing their task without faults.

A reboot will cause a network outage - there is no need to do it in case everything is working normal.

No gain whatsoever I could see from rebooting a flawless system.

Hope this helps! Please rate all posts.

Regards, Martin

Hall of Fame Super Silver

Re: Rebooting switches and routers

The only instance in which I would say this is unequivocally a good idea is one in which a known bug is causing, say, a memory leak which, uncorrected, will lead to a system crash. In that case, one would monitor memory usage and schedule preventitive maintenance reboots to forestall an unplanned outage.

Other than something like that, the practice of keeping one's IOS/CatOS relatively current (i.e., at least on a supported release) and analyzing new features for utility in your environment (or, more likely bug or vulnerability fixes) would more likely be the catalyst for introducing a new software version (and thus indirectly requiring a reboot to load the new code).

Hope this helps. Please rate it if it does.

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