Cisco Support Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Announcements

Welcome to Cisco Support Community. We would love to have your feedback.

For an introduction to the new site, click here. And see here for current known issues.

New Member

Stackable and non-stackable?

Hi,

I am just wondering what does it mean when it state that a switch is stackable or non-stakable? What is the different between it?

what the different between cascading and stacking?

Thanks.

LS Ang

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
New Member

Re: Stackable and non-stackable?

Unfortunatly "stackable" is one of those terms that different vendors have used for different things. It originally came from hubs where 2 or more stackable hubs joined together would act as one logical hub (avoiding the 5-4-3 rule limitations). The hubs would usually have a special "stack" port on the back with a multi-pin cable joining the hubs together. When switches came along, different vendors tried to apply the term "stackable" to the switches in different ways. It usually means that you connect the switches together through a special cable / port and the whole cluster of switches is managable through one IP and interface (so four 48 port switches act like one big 192 port switch). Other vendors just mean that there is a special (high-speed (2.5-8Gbs)) interface that hooks the switches together (often bus-to-bus). One (infamous) vendor used the term just to mean that you could physically place one switch on top of the other and the feet on the upper switch would fit into indentations on the lower switches!

Cascading switches just means hooking one switch up to another through normal (usually Ethernet) ports. You still get the ability to have more ports, but it is often slower and you lose the single interface / IP managability (which in my opinion if of limited use).

1 REPLY
New Member

Re: Stackable and non-stackable?

Unfortunatly "stackable" is one of those terms that different vendors have used for different things. It originally came from hubs where 2 or more stackable hubs joined together would act as one logical hub (avoiding the 5-4-3 rule limitations). The hubs would usually have a special "stack" port on the back with a multi-pin cable joining the hubs together. When switches came along, different vendors tried to apply the term "stackable" to the switches in different ways. It usually means that you connect the switches together through a special cable / port and the whole cluster of switches is managable through one IP and interface (so four 48 port switches act like one big 192 port switch). Other vendors just mean that there is a special (high-speed (2.5-8Gbs)) interface that hooks the switches together (often bus-to-bus). One (infamous) vendor used the term just to mean that you could physically place one switch on top of the other and the feet on the upper switch would fit into indentations on the lower switches!

Cascading switches just means hooking one switch up to another through normal (usually Ethernet) ports. You still get the ability to have more ports, but it is often slower and you lose the single interface / IP managability (which in my opinion if of limited use).

4734
Views
3
Helpful
1
Replies