Cisco Support Community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Announcements

Welcome to Cisco Support Community. We would love to have your feedback.

For an introduction to the new site, click here. And see here for current known issues.

New Member

Using 1252's on 10/100 ports instead of gig-e

Hi Everyone. I had a quick question regarding using a 1252 Access Point with a power injector but only on a 10/100 port. I saw that Cisco and Intel have a nice white paper that shows actual throughput benchmarks with 802.11n clients in different spots. However, I didn't see any actual throughput values for the 1252 on a 10/100 port. I understand that a gig-e port is desired over fast ethernet, but like many other companies, we just don't have gigabit ports everywhere. I'm planning on installing most of the 1252's I get on gig-e ports, but a few of them are in areas where we only have 10/100 ports on the switch. Has anyone done any kind of benchmarking with the 1252 on a 10/100 port? I'd be interested to see how it scales when compared to the benchmarks of the AP on a gig port. By the way all my switches have gigabit uplinks, so only the 10/100 port would be the restriction...

3 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Gold

Re: Using 1252's on 10/100 ports instead of gig-e

Hi Craig,

What will you intend to use the AP for? I mean, if it's just limited wireless then I guess 10/100 is OK. But if you plan to use the AP for high-volume traffic then it would be recommended to put more AP's around to minimize the natural bottleneck coming from the switching infrastructure.

Hope this helps.

New Member

Re: Using 1252's on 10/100 ports instead of gig-e

You could use a GLC-T, Copper Gigabit Ethernet SFP module...or if you have older switches with a spare GBIC slot, a copper GBIC.

Gig switches are pricey.

New Member

Re: Using 1252's on 10/100 ports instead of gig-e

The AP's that will be on 10/100 ports are in light to moderate traffic areas. The major areas will have the gig-e ports. I thought of possibly using GBIC's / SFP's to get the last three on gig ports, but I wasn't sure if there were any compatibility issues associated with that. I had some issues with using GLC-T's and the fiber interface on a 4402 WLC. The GLC-T's didn't let me connect to the WLC through port 1. I had to configure an address on the service port and use that interface for initial programming. It's not really a big deal since I'm using the GLC-SX-MM's in production, but if I run into the same problem but with the 1252's then the AP will not connect to the controller. I have two GLC-T's laying around that I can test with once I get the new AP's. I'm going to try and mimic the Cisco/Intel whitepaper tests regarding 1252 / 802.11n performance. The only difference will show my findings with the AP's on 10/100 ports. I'm sure I'll be able to tax out the AP, I just want to know exactly what it would take to make the wireless users attached to an AP like that slow down / have performance issues. I was thinking of using the mixed mode tests where I start with 1N and say 8 or 9 ABG clients. Then slowly increment the N users and decrease the legacy clients. This should tell me what mix of clients can get by using a 1252 with a 10/100 port instead of a gig-e port. I keep hearing great things about N, and the information (if accurate) shows that the benefits are quite nice, even compared to fast ethernet. However I just don't want to convert an already working wireless network to a system that may cause users denial of service / performance problems. Of course that's the beauty of testing right?

152
Views
0
Helpful
3
Replies