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WI-FI Alliance

Is BR1400 Model a WI-FI Alliance?

I have serched WI-FI certified products list on WI-FI web site,But i can't find BR1400 in the list.

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Re: WI-FI Alliance

I don't know for a fact, but I suspect not.

Wi-Fi only covers APs. To operate as a bridge (especially one made for distance) the "normal" 802.11{abg} parameters have to be "stretched" to accommodate the longer delays and likelyhood of noise and other interference.

That is why "wireless bridges" tend to operate as proprietary devices (i.e., you can't use a Cisco bridge (root or non-root) with some other manufacturer's similar product).

As such, it can't meet the WiFi specs for having "open, standard" operating protocols.

AFAIK, ther are no standards (yet?) for wireless bridges. This isn't just a "Cisco thing"

Bridges acting as repeaters, and 'bridges' that associate with APs as a client are a different animal. These bridges will not talk to a wireless bridge that is setup for long range point-to-point (or point-to-multipoint) mode (root or non-root).

Good Luck

Scott

1 REPLY
Green

Re: WI-FI Alliance

I don't know for a fact, but I suspect not.

Wi-Fi only covers APs. To operate as a bridge (especially one made for distance) the "normal" 802.11{abg} parameters have to be "stretched" to accommodate the longer delays and likelyhood of noise and other interference.

That is why "wireless bridges" tend to operate as proprietary devices (i.e., you can't use a Cisco bridge (root or non-root) with some other manufacturer's similar product).

As such, it can't meet the WiFi specs for having "open, standard" operating protocols.

AFAIK, ther are no standards (yet?) for wireless bridges. This isn't just a "Cisco thing"

Bridges acting as repeaters, and 'bridges' that associate with APs as a client are a different animal. These bridges will not talk to a wireless bridge that is setup for long range point-to-point (or point-to-multipoint) mode (root or non-root).

Good Luck

Scott

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