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Community Member

route to subnet not to host

I am installing a Cisco RV042G router that will handle Internet access at  one location.  There is another location connected to the first location with a T1 . What I want to do is created a route to the remote subnet (across the t1) inside the RVO42G. I understand how to create a route to an individual IP address (host), but I need the entire subnet at the other end of the T1 accessible. By the way, the Internet is reached through a cable modem, and the remote network through the T1. I am installing the RVO42G behind the cable modem so the gateway for this network will be the inside IP of the RVO42G.  I want to advertise that the route to the remote network is through another router attached to the T1.  I want the entire subnet at the other end of the T1 accessible.

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Hey Kevin,In addition to what

Hey Kevin,
In addition to what Chris has said,

You can create a static route in the RV042G router that points to the other end, which will give you access to the entire subnet.
Lets say the subnet is 172.31.10.0 and your next hop ip address is 10.10.10.2.

-> Setup
-> Advanced routing page
-> click ipv4 tab
-> static route
-> Add to List
-> Destination IP - 172.31.10.0
-> Subnet mask - 255.255.255.0
-> Default Gateway - 10.10.10.2

-> Hop count - X
-> Interface - Select the interface to use for this route.

The other end needs the route pointing back to the RV042G's network.

Here is a link that points the administration guide for the RV042G.
http://www.cisco.com/c/dam/en/us/td/docs/routers/csbr/rv0xx/administration/guide/rv0xx_AG_78-19576_310513.pdf


Hope this helps,
if so, please rate.

3 REPLIES
Highlighted

Not sure I understand the

Not sure I understand the question.  When you create a route, you are specifying (typically) a range of destination address (i.e. a subnet) and instructing the router how to route packets for those destination addresses to the next hop (i.e. the next router in the chain that will lead to the destination).  The final hop will be, not the destination host, but a router that is on the same subnet as the destination host.  When that happens, the local (to the destination) router will use layer 2 protocols to reach the actual host.

So in this case, the destination and subnet mask will be the entire subnet that you want routed across the WAN, but the next-hop address will be the WAN interface of the RVO42G, if that is directly accessible.

Hey Kevin,In addition to what

Hey Kevin,
In addition to what Chris has said,

You can create a static route in the RV042G router that points to the other end, which will give you access to the entire subnet.
Lets say the subnet is 172.31.10.0 and your next hop ip address is 10.10.10.2.

-> Setup
-> Advanced routing page
-> click ipv4 tab
-> static route
-> Add to List
-> Destination IP - 172.31.10.0
-> Subnet mask - 255.255.255.0
-> Default Gateway - 10.10.10.2

-> Hop count - X
-> Interface - Select the interface to use for this route.

The other end needs the route pointing back to the RV042G's network.

Here is a link that points the administration guide for the RV042G.
http://www.cisco.com/c/dam/en/us/td/docs/routers/csbr/rv0xx/administration/guide/rv0xx_AG_78-19576_310513.pdf


Hope this helps,
if so, please rate.

Community Member

I am going to try your

I am going to try your solution here. It makes sense to me.  I suspect that if you did want to route to a specific host, you would indicated the ip of that host and the last octet would not be "0", but would be the last octet of the host you wanted to reach.  The rest I believe I understand. The key thing in your illustration is   "Destination IP - 172.31.10."0".  Maybe I am being a bit verbose here, but I want to make this very clear to all concerned.  The route to the Internet is through the RV042, but the route to this other network/subnet is through another router.  So I think in this context  Default Gateway is not the RV042 address, but the address of the IP of the router through which you must go to get to this other network, in your case 10.10.10.2 .

I'll let you know if this works, but I really suspect this is the answer.  I appreciate it. This is a case of one little detail holding me up.

Thanks

 

Kevin

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