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Setting Up VLAN/QoS for VOIP on RV180

I posted earlier concerning setting up VLAN/QoS for VOIP on the SG200-18 (see: https://supportforums.cisco.com/discussion/12193666/setting-vlan-and-qos-voip-sg200-18). 

 

I did go ahead and purchase the RV180. I have it connected to the SG200-18.

 

I want to proceed with setting up VLAN/QoS on the RV180 so my VOIP phone (Grandstream Cordless VOIP phone) is on its own separate VLAN from the rest of the network, as well as ensure all the QoS settings are optimized to give the VOIP phone top priority to the network.

 

Currently, I still have the VOIP phone connected to the SG200-18 as mentioned in the previous post. 

 

Here's my questions:

 

1. Should I leave the VOIP phone connected to the SG200-18 and config all the VLAN, Switch VLAN, and Voice VLAN settings down to the VOIP phone, or should I plug the VOIP phone directly into the RV180? Which would give me better performance and be simpler to do?

 

2. How do I go about putting the VOIP phone on its own VLAN, as well as optimizing the QoS Settings so it gets top priority to the network?

 

3. I currently have the VOIP phone set to reserve a DHCP address in the 192.168.x range. When moving it to the VLAN, will I need to adjust the DCHP reservation and/or my firewall settings (I have it through the firewall as well)

 

4. I'm also getting a Grandstream desk VOIP phone to beta test. When installing it, do I need to plug it directly into the RV180 or the SG200-18, and do I need to put it on the same VLAN as the Grandstream Cordless VOIP phone or a different VLAN? It also supports PoE, but the RV180 or SG200-18 model I have doesn't. If I use external power, will plugging it into either device be OK or could anything become fried?

 

Thanks!

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Silver

Hello,1. Should I leave the

Hello,

1. Should I leave the VOIP phone connected to the SG200-18 and config all the VLAN, Switch VLAN, and Voice VLAN settings down to the VOIP phone, or should I plug the VOIP phone directly into the RV180? Which would give me better performance and be simpler to do?

There won't be much of a performance difference between being on the switch or being on the router, so it mostly comes down to configuration simplicity.  If you plug the phone directly into the router you won't really have to bother trunking the VLAN or any of that to the switch.

It really comes down to what is more convenient, but if you are able to plug into the RV directly I wouldn't worry about QoS on the switch. 

So let's talk about setting up the RV180.

First go to Networking >> LAN >> VLAN Membership.  Enable VLANs, and add a new VLAN for voice (most people use 100 for voice for some reason, but it doesn't matter).  You will want to set the port that the phone is plugged into to untagged for the new voice VLAN, and you can exclude the data VLAN from that port.

Then go to Multiple VLAN Subnets and setup the address range for he new subnet (192.168.100.0 for example) and setup DHCP if you would like to use it (makes things a bit easier)

Finally to enable QoS on the RV go to QoS >> WAN QoS profiles.  Enable WAN QoS, make sure it is set to priority mode, and add a new entry to the table.  You can name it whatever you'd like (I used VoiP) and set the priority to High.

Then go down to the Profile Binding page and add a new entry there. Select the profile you just created from the drop down, set the service to any, and for traffic selector select VLAN, and make sure the dropdown for VLAN is the VoIP VLAN.

At this point we have a setup where the voice traffic (or basically anything on the Voice VLAN) will get priority when it is going out the WAN interface.  

 

3. I currently have the VOIP phone set to reserve a DHCP address in the 192.168.x range. When moving it to the VLAN, will I need to adjust the DCHP reservation and/or my firewall settings (I have it through the firewall as well)

The second VLAN should have a different subnet setup for it, as I talked about above.  During that process you will setup the DHCP server for the new VLAN as well.  You would need to adjust your reservations for the phones, however it doesn't really matter what IP they get, since we are prioritizing the entire voice VLAN, so you don't have to setup a reservation unless you really want to.

4.  The Grandstream phone.

I would put the Grandstream (and any other VoIP phones you might get) into the voice VLAN as well so that it would get the same priority treatment.  At this point with multiple devices you may want to actually setup a trunk to the switch (normal VLAN untagged and voice VLAN tagged) and setup ports for the voice VLAN for those phones.  That will make sure the switch prioritizes voice traffic as well, although it probably isn't as important internally as it is on the WAN.

As for a PoE device connected to a non-PoE switch or router, there won't be any issues.  I'm guessing the phone also comes with a power adapter.  It will not feed that power back into the wire just because it's PoE, that is pretty much a one-way circuit.

 

Hope that helps,

Christopher Ebert - Advanced Network Support Engineer

Cisco Small Business Support Center

*please rate helpful posts*

6 REPLIES
Silver

Hello,1. Should I leave the

Hello,

1. Should I leave the VOIP phone connected to the SG200-18 and config all the VLAN, Switch VLAN, and Voice VLAN settings down to the VOIP phone, or should I plug the VOIP phone directly into the RV180? Which would give me better performance and be simpler to do?

There won't be much of a performance difference between being on the switch or being on the router, so it mostly comes down to configuration simplicity.  If you plug the phone directly into the router you won't really have to bother trunking the VLAN or any of that to the switch.

It really comes down to what is more convenient, but if you are able to plug into the RV directly I wouldn't worry about QoS on the switch. 

So let's talk about setting up the RV180.

First go to Networking >> LAN >> VLAN Membership.  Enable VLANs, and add a new VLAN for voice (most people use 100 for voice for some reason, but it doesn't matter).  You will want to set the port that the phone is plugged into to untagged for the new voice VLAN, and you can exclude the data VLAN from that port.

Then go to Multiple VLAN Subnets and setup the address range for he new subnet (192.168.100.0 for example) and setup DHCP if you would like to use it (makes things a bit easier)

Finally to enable QoS on the RV go to QoS >> WAN QoS profiles.  Enable WAN QoS, make sure it is set to priority mode, and add a new entry to the table.  You can name it whatever you'd like (I used VoiP) and set the priority to High.

Then go down to the Profile Binding page and add a new entry there. Select the profile you just created from the drop down, set the service to any, and for traffic selector select VLAN, and make sure the dropdown for VLAN is the VoIP VLAN.

At this point we have a setup where the voice traffic (or basically anything on the Voice VLAN) will get priority when it is going out the WAN interface.  

 

3. I currently have the VOIP phone set to reserve a DHCP address in the 192.168.x range. When moving it to the VLAN, will I need to adjust the DCHP reservation and/or my firewall settings (I have it through the firewall as well)

The second VLAN should have a different subnet setup for it, as I talked about above.  During that process you will setup the DHCP server for the new VLAN as well.  You would need to adjust your reservations for the phones, however it doesn't really matter what IP they get, since we are prioritizing the entire voice VLAN, so you don't have to setup a reservation unless you really want to.

4.  The Grandstream phone.

I would put the Grandstream (and any other VoIP phones you might get) into the voice VLAN as well so that it would get the same priority treatment.  At this point with multiple devices you may want to actually setup a trunk to the switch (normal VLAN untagged and voice VLAN tagged) and setup ports for the voice VLAN for those phones.  That will make sure the switch prioritizes voice traffic as well, although it probably isn't as important internally as it is on the WAN.

As for a PoE device connected to a non-PoE switch or router, there won't be any issues.  I'm guessing the phone also comes with a power adapter.  It will not feed that power back into the wire just because it's PoE, that is pretty much a one-way circuit.

 

Hope that helps,

Christopher Ebert - Advanced Network Support Engineer

Cisco Small Business Support Center

*please rate helpful posts*

New Member

Thanks for the information!

Thanks for the information! My ISP/VOIP provider was out here recently and made some adjustments to the RV180. We did decide to run both phones directly into the RV180 so we didn't have to mess with the switch. I'll pass this information onto them just in case they want to double-check any of the settings and have me fine-tune anything.

New Member

I looked over the info and

I looked over the info and had a WebEx session with Cisco Support, and I did need to adjust a few things like you mentioned. Mine was still chunking out the old IP addresses on VLAN1, so when I went in and adjusted the Subnets and re-assigned some stuff, it all kicked in.

 

Thanks again for your help!

New Member

Hi, I have a very similar

Hi,

 

I have a very similar setup, however when there is a network congestion my audio seems to get delayed. I dial into a VoIP echo test number and keep talking and it echo's it back. Then I run a bandwidth speed test, everything is fine when it is performing a download test. When it is performing the upload test the echo gets delayed, sometime over 8 seconds. However, the quality of audio is just fine without any issues.

 

My Setup

RV180 Router (192.168.69.1/255.255.255.192)

VoIP Router connected to port 2 and uses static IP on subnet 2 (VLAN 100)

VLAN Membership:

Default VLAN (0):Port 2 is excluded.

VOIP VLAN (100): Port 2 is untagged

Multiple VLAN Subnets

VLAN 100 : IP Address 192.168.69.69/255.255.255.192). DNS Proxy is disabled

QoS

WAN QoS is enabled

QoS Mode is Priority

WAN QoS Profile (VOIP) is created with Priority set to "High"

Profile Binding

VOIP, traffic selector is VLAN and VLAN ID set to 100

 

What am I missing? Is there anything else I can do to minimize the delay?

 

Thanks

P

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Member

Is your VoIP router set as a

Is your VoIP router set as a Gateway with NAT enabled? If so, your VoIP traffic is being NAT'd twice. That will cause call quality issues on VoIP phones. If you are using a hosted PBX service, you will want to verify if SIP ALG needs to be disabled on the RV180.

New Member

By the way everyone, for my

By the way everyone, for my question, we've moved off of the Grandstream VOIP phones and transitioned to using our smartphones for all of our calls (cellular, Skype, Skype for Business, etc.). We did adjust QoS settings on the router to allow Wi-Fi calls to have priority, plus we've deployed a backup cellular booster for cellular calls and also put it on its own VLAN and ensured it priority in our system (Cisco engineers walked us through all of this). I am leaving this discussion up though for others who need to adjust QoS and VLAN settings for VOIP though, as the info we received here was excellent, and this discussion can be beneficial to others. Thanks again for your assistance!

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