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SG-300 LAG speed

Dear forumers,

I'm configuring two SG-300 switches at the moment, and I'm trying to connect them with two cables.

I've set up the LAG like this (on both switches):

LAG001.jpg

And a got the following result:

LAG002.jpg

This means my connection is at only 1 Gbit/sec, or everything is OK I'm at 2 Gbit/sec?

At the moment I can not preform a test with many computers copying at the same time and check the total speed. How can I make sure that the LAG's speed is more than 1 Gbit/sec?

Best regards,

Ádám Ráksi

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1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Green

SG-300 LAG speed

Hi Adam,

There isn't really a particular way to measure There are some software tools that can measure traffic such as IPERF.

The LAG works in such a way it will negotiate the link speed. Each physical port can't exceed 1g so it will show 1g. However, as you already know, the LAG joins multiple physical ports to a port group that will 'combine' the ports to increase the speed using a load balance algorithm.

A lot of times physically measuring a LAG throughput is very difficult because the file transfer needs to be really huge to reach the port group potential.

-Tom

-Tom Please mark answered for helpful posts http://blogs.cisco.com/smallbusiness/
1 REPLY
Green

SG-300 LAG speed

Hi Adam,

There isn't really a particular way to measure There are some software tools that can measure traffic such as IPERF.

The LAG works in such a way it will negotiate the link speed. Each physical port can't exceed 1g so it will show 1g. However, as you already know, the LAG joins multiple physical ports to a port group that will 'combine' the ports to increase the speed using a load balance algorithm.

A lot of times physically measuring a LAG throughput is very difficult because the file transfer needs to be really huge to reach the port group potential.

-Tom

-Tom Please mark answered for helpful posts http://blogs.cisco.com/smallbusiness/
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