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WAP 121 Range problem

Hi,

i have WAP121 AP, I'm facing some range problem, not covering as much distance.

How to check AP coverage distance??

Are there any tools to get actual distance covering (in meter) each AP because my customer wants detail test report?

What is the normal distance coverage of WAP121, if we consider without any interference and no walls?

 

Thanks

Sujish Sudhakaran

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

My name Eric Moyers. I am an

My name Eric Moyers. I am an Engineer in the Small Business Support Center.

I am sorry to hear that you are experiencing this issue. 

Distance or coverage is not an exact science when you talk about a customers environment. The reason is every location is different. If your read about wireless signals and coverage, all of those numbers are usually based on a perfect environment with little to no interference.

The bad thing is nearly all customer environments will suffer from some type of issue that will degrade the reach and throughput of the signal.

The Wi-Fi signal range of any given access point also varies significantly from device to devices. Factors that determine the range of one access point include:

  • the specific 802.11 protocol it runs
  • the strength of its device transmitter
  • the nature of physical obstructions and/or radio interference in the surrounding area

A general rule of thumb in home networking says that Wi-Fi routers operating on the traditional 2.4 GHz band reach up to 150 feet (46 m) indoors and 300 feet (92 m) outdoors. Newer 802.11n and 802.11ac routers that operate on both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands vary in the reach similarly.

Physical obstructions in homes such as brick walls and metal frames or siding reduce the range of a Wi-Fi network by 25% or more. Due to laws of physics, 5 GHz Wi-Fi connections are more susceptible to obstructions than are 2.4 GHz and will actually have a shorter reach but better signal.

Radio signal interference from microwave ovens and other equipment also negatively affects Wi-Fi network range. Because 2.4 GHz radios are commonly used in consumer gadgets, those Wi-Fi connections protocols are more susceptible to interference inside residential buildings.

 To better determine a good course of action for you and your customer could you give some detail on the environment that the WAP is located? What is his current reach? What is the load? How many customer is he trying to connect?  What type of building is it, construction wise, how many rooms, etc. 

If you prefer you can also call our support center and open a case so that one of our engineers can work directly with you.
http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/web/tsd-cisco-small-business-support-center-contacts.html

Eric Moyers
.:|:.:|:. CISCO | Cisco Presales Technical Support | Wireless Subject Matter Expert

Please rate helpful Posts and Let others know when your Question has been answered.

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Please refer to the following

Please refer to the following link:

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/wireless/5500-series-wireless-controllers/116057-site-survey-guidelines-wlan-00.html

My name Eric Moyers. I am an

My name Eric Moyers. I am an Engineer in the Small Business Support Center.

I am sorry to hear that you are experiencing this issue. 

Distance or coverage is not an exact science when you talk about a customers environment. The reason is every location is different. If your read about wireless signals and coverage, all of those numbers are usually based on a perfect environment with little to no interference.

The bad thing is nearly all customer environments will suffer from some type of issue that will degrade the reach and throughput of the signal.

The Wi-Fi signal range of any given access point also varies significantly from device to devices. Factors that determine the range of one access point include:

  • the specific 802.11 protocol it runs
  • the strength of its device transmitter
  • the nature of physical obstructions and/or radio interference in the surrounding area

A general rule of thumb in home networking says that Wi-Fi routers operating on the traditional 2.4 GHz band reach up to 150 feet (46 m) indoors and 300 feet (92 m) outdoors. Newer 802.11n and 802.11ac routers that operate on both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands vary in the reach similarly.

Physical obstructions in homes such as brick walls and metal frames or siding reduce the range of a Wi-Fi network by 25% or more. Due to laws of physics, 5 GHz Wi-Fi connections are more susceptible to obstructions than are 2.4 GHz and will actually have a shorter reach but better signal.

Radio signal interference from microwave ovens and other equipment also negatively affects Wi-Fi network range. Because 2.4 GHz radios are commonly used in consumer gadgets, those Wi-Fi connections protocols are more susceptible to interference inside residential buildings.

 To better determine a good course of action for you and your customer could you give some detail on the environment that the WAP is located? What is his current reach? What is the load? How many customer is he trying to connect?  What type of building is it, construction wise, how many rooms, etc. 

If you prefer you can also call our support center and open a case so that one of our engineers can work directly with you.
http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/web/tsd-cisco-small-business-support-center-contacts.html

Eric Moyers
.:|:.:|:. CISCO | Cisco Presales Technical Support | Wireless Subject Matter Expert

Please rate helpful Posts and Let others know when your Question has been answered.

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