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Expressway-C and Expressway-E and VCS Expressway

 

Hi,

 

I'm confusing of these three

 

I know Expressway-E is used with Expressway-C

Their function is as VCS Expressway ? or I'm wrong ?

 

Please help in knowing when to use each of which ?

Also why we use it beside the firewall ? what is mean by firewall traversal ?

 

Also when I connect from external with Jabber , is there any type of registeration with each of them ? that I see a supported number of registeration of 2500 and 5000 in the VCS Expressway data sheet

 

Thanks

Haitham

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Hi Haitham,In general, an

Hi Haitham,

In general, an endpoint/client will need to register to a "device" in order that it can be used as part of an enterprise dialplan. This "device" could be CUCM OR a VCS and will determine if an endpoint/client is allow to connect and/or how calls to and form it may be made.

If an endpoint does NOT register to one of these devices (CUCM or VCS), it could still be used (such as a stand alone video conferencing device), it's just that it will not be seen as part of the enterprise call structure. It may not appear in phonebooks, it may not be privileged to call outside, etc etc. The Jabber client HAS to register with either CUCM or a VCS in order for it to work at all.

If you are using CUCM with a VCS-E, then endpoints will register to CUCM. If the endpoints are internal to the enterprise, they will register directly to CUCM, and if the are external then they will connect via the VCS-E and the registration will be tunnelled through to CUCM, thus still registering with CUCM.

In the VCS-C/E with TMS environment, endpoints will register to the VCS-C when internal, and again potentially use the VCS-E to tunnel external device registration requests back to the VCS-C. Depending on how you want to deploy these devices, external devices/clients could actually register directly with the VCS-E, but I'm getting ahead of things. Jabber in this environment uses TMS to provide user authentication, although the actual registration takes place on the VCS.

Does this help?

 

Chris

3 REPLIES

Arggghh - These Rubbish new

Arggghh - These Rubbish new forum design - PLEASE CISCO SORT IT OUT. Just lost another half an hour as when hit the reply button after typing, you loose everything. Along with all the other problems (such as no spell check, no email subscription to the forum, RSS feeds hit and miss, poor performance, notification not showing properly, unable to see all of you own previous posts easily.. etc etc), what a pain.

 

Still, rant over and I not going to be beaten by this, so back to the post.. again

The VCS (Video Communication Server) server is an appliance that comes in two flavours - the VCS Expressway and VCS Control, commonly know as the VCS-E and VCS-C. They are often used together to provide a firewall traversal solution for traditional videoconferencing (H.323 and SIP) based endpoint that allow many devices inside an organisation the ability to talk to other devices in the outside world. However, they can also be used separately in some deployments.

A firewall traversal solution enable devices that use these chatty protocols (H.323 and SIP) to be able to communicate with like devices outside to corporate firewall, yet only mean that a small number of ports need to be opened or managed between a couple of devices. The protocol require a number of ports in order to operate, and multiple devices and calls may mean a large number of ports to many devices could be required to be open. Network admins general get the hump if they were asked to open whacking great holes in their firewall to enable such communication, and as such the VCS-C/E solution provides a neat way to enable this and keep the network admin happy. They do not replace a firewall, merely enable communication across it in an efficient manner.

To confuse matters, Cisco have decided to introduce the Expressway Solution which connects CUCM to a VCS-E (as mentioned above) with (as far as I understand it) a special licence. I don't know much about this solution as we don't use CUCM, although this seems to be Cisco's preferred communications technology going forward. It can register devices that use either SIP or SCCP (Skinny) protocols.

To further confuse things, Cisco in their infinite wisdom have two separate products called Jabber (!!!!) - one that works with CUCM, and the other called Jabber for Telepresence. I think the grand idea was to unify these clients however they are provisioned by two completely different technologies, one built by Cisco (CUCM), and the other build by Tandberg (whom Cisco bought), and I can;t see this happening any time soon. In fact Jabber for Telepresence has just had a new update release in the past few days.

In order to use Jabber with CUCM, you would obviously need CUCM. In order to use Jabber for Telepresence, you would probably need TMS (Telepresence Management Suite), although you can also purchase an Expressway starter pack (meant for small business I think) that is a VCS-E (as mentioned above) with another special licence enabling it too to provision Jabber for Telepresence clients.

I think you might be referring to Jabber with CUCM and the Expressway solution, although one thing to mention with all of this is that registration licences is not the same as call licences.

I expect this is as clear as mud, but unfortunately this is as straight forward as I think I can make it.

Good Luck

Chris

 Great Post ChrisYou light me

 

Great Post Chris

You light me good points

 

Only you say above this:  It can register devices that use either SIP or SCCP (Skinny) protocols.

you mean it register to VCS-E ?

 

So If I need to have a video traversal server. Will I get both VCS-E and VCS-C both

Or VCS expressway only. I see the datasheet for this one is different than the VCS-E and VCS-C

 

Also I didn't get the point of registeration. I still confused about what will be registered to this VCS !!

 

 

Thanks again Chris

 

Haitham

Hi Haitham,In general, an

Hi Haitham,

In general, an endpoint/client will need to register to a "device" in order that it can be used as part of an enterprise dialplan. This "device" could be CUCM OR a VCS and will determine if an endpoint/client is allow to connect and/or how calls to and form it may be made.

If an endpoint does NOT register to one of these devices (CUCM or VCS), it could still be used (such as a stand alone video conferencing device), it's just that it will not be seen as part of the enterprise call structure. It may not appear in phonebooks, it may not be privileged to call outside, etc etc. The Jabber client HAS to register with either CUCM or a VCS in order for it to work at all.

If you are using CUCM with a VCS-E, then endpoints will register to CUCM. If the endpoints are internal to the enterprise, they will register directly to CUCM, and if the are external then they will connect via the VCS-E and the registration will be tunnelled through to CUCM, thus still registering with CUCM.

In the VCS-C/E with TMS environment, endpoints will register to the VCS-C when internal, and again potentially use the VCS-E to tunnel external device registration requests back to the VCS-C. Depending on how you want to deploy these devices, external devices/clients could actually register directly with the VCS-E, but I'm getting ahead of things. Jabber in this environment uses TMS to provide user authentication, although the actual registration takes place on the VCS.

Does this help?

 

Chris

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