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Floor Load for a TX9000

What is the floor loading for a TX9000 system in psi, psf, etc?                  

2 REPLIES
Cisco Employee

Re: Floor Load for a TX9000

Hi Michael,

There's no exact numercial information for the floor loading of TX9000.

We can get to know the weight of TX9000 on the assembly guide. It's 2041lbs(926kg.)

TX9200 and TX9000 Assembly Guide

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/telepresence/tx9000/assembly_guide/tx9000_9200_assembly_guide/tx9000_pallet_dimensions.html#pgfId-1096803

Regards,

Yusuke

Floor Load for a TX9000

This is a new one, but I can see the need in some cases to need to know this. Anyway you would need to have the total weight of the system and the total surface area of the contact points that bear weight. Lets assume a TX9000 with wall mounted reflector

Total Weight = 2041lbs

Number of contact Points = 22

Surface Area of Contact points = X

Now we need surface area of all weight bearing contact points (measurements are approximates-never thought to measure these). Anyway the number below are SWAGs but should be close.

Reflector Wall - 225" Long x ~1" Deep

Display Frame Support Feet - 12 Support Feet ~1.5" Diameter

Table Support Feet - 8 Support Feet ~~1.5" Diameter

Cable Runner* - This part only supports it own weight and since it has such a large surface area it will skew the results. You would need to decide if this needs to be calculated separately.

If the PSI is critical in the final placement or support requirments you may want to calculate the display support psi and the table psi seperately as well since the displays and support are so much heavier than the table assembly. 

Figure out the total surface area of all contact points then divide the total weight by the surface area and your answer will be the psi

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