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New Member

Can videoconference traffic pass through a 1700 router?

Our customer wants to install videoconferencing equipment, but they have 1700 series router in their network. In the documentation we can find that 1700 is "h.323 compliant". I know it is not adequate (2500 and up is the right choice), but can it serve the purpose, even in the most basic way?

4 REPLIES
Silver

Re: Can videoconference traffic pass through a 1700 router?

Yes, the Cisco 1700 Series Modular Routers can of course be used for video conferencing. I am not sure if it can be used for very complicated applications. But it can be surely used for applications like Netmeeting since it is H232 compatible. I have a document to support my statement.

Cisco 1751 Modular Access Router Voice Features Overview

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/products/hw/routers/ps221/prod_bulletin09186a00800e444f.html

New Member

Re: Can videoconference traffic pass through a 1700 router?

There is no issue with running H.323 video traffic through a 1720 router. The 1720, however, does not support Multimedia Conference Manager (Gatekeeper/QoS Proxy) as does its bigger brothers

New Member

Re: Can videoconference traffic pass through a 1700 router?

Now that you mentioned it... Generally speaking, do I have to use a gatekeeper or not? For instance, I have a point to point configuration installed. Why do I need a gatekeeper/ proxy?

Forgive me if my Q is silly, but I am just starting to know videoconferencing. I understood that gatekeeper is required when one needs to route and control many calls from different sites.

Can you clear this up for me, please?

New Member

Re: Can videoconference traffic pass through a 1700 router?

As far as the H.323 spec is concerned, a GK is optional. Its primary function is addressing (dial plans) and basic bandwidth management. That said, the Cisco MCM offers both GK and QoS Proxy capability. The QoS Proxy enables quality of service (i.e., ToS/DSCP and RSVP) as well as security enhancements (i.e., NAT, FW). So in a pt-pt environment as you describe, it would be helpful to have at least 1 GK in the network, but QoS Proxies are recommended for both sides of the link. Cisco offers an IPVC design guide that describes in detail when/how to use these devices. I recommend finding this doc on CCO

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