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Community Member

destination-pattern T

Hi all

Here is my dialplan ;

dial-peer voice 6 pots
 destination-pattern 00T
 port 0/0/0:15
 forward-digits all

 

when i check that i see no matches

sh dialplan number 004343434343
Macro Exp.: 004343434343
No match, result=1

when i change like that it works !

dial-peer voice 6 pots
 destination-pattern 00
 port 0/0/0:15
 forward-digits all

sh dialplan number 0089898989
Macro Exp.: 0089898989

VoiceEncapPeer6
        peer type = voice, information type = voice,
        description = `',

 

what is diference between 00 and 00T and why 00T doen not work ? i am confused.

 

 

 

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions

Hi. See here:http://www.cisco

Hi. See here:http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/ios/12_2/voice/configuration/guide/fvvfax_c/vvfpeers.html

Fixed- and Variable-Length Dial Plans

Fixed-length dialing plans, in which all the dial-peer destination patterns have a fixed length, are sufficient for most voice networks because the telephone number strings are of known lengths. Some voice networks, however, require variable-length dial plans, particularly for international calls, which use telephone numbers of different lengths.

 

If you enter the timeout T-indicator at the end of the destination pattern in an outbound voice-network dial peer, the router accepts a fixed-length dial string and then waits for additional dialed digits. The timeout character must be an uppercase T. The following dial-peer configuration shows how the T-indicator is set to allow variable-length dial strings:

 

dial-peer voice 1 voip
 destination-pattern 2222T
 session target ipv4:10.10.1.1

In the example above, the router accepts the digits 2222, and then waits for an unspecified number of additional digits. The router can collect up to 31 additional digits, as long as the interdigit timeout has not expired. When the interdigit timeout expires, the router places the call.

The default value for the interdigit timeout is 10 seconds. Unless the default value is changed, using the T-indicator adds 10 seconds to each call setup because the call is not attempted until the timer has expired (unless the # character is used as a terminator). You should therefore reduce the voice-port interdigit timeout value if you use variable-length dial plans. You can change the interdigit timeout by using the timeouts inter-digit voice-port command.

 

The calling party can immediately terminate the interdigit timeout by entering the # character. If the # character is entered while the router is waiting for additional digits, the # character is treated as a terminator; it is not treated as part of the dial string or sent across the network. But if the # character is entered before the router begins waiting for additional digits (meaning that the # is entered as part of the fixed-length destination pattern), then the # character is treated as a dialed digit.

 

For example, if the destination pattern is configured as 2222...T, then the entire dialed string of 2222#9999 is collected, but if the dialed string is 2222#99#99, the #99 at the end of the dialed digits is not collected because the final # character is treated as a terminator. You can change the termination character by using the dial-peer terminator command.

Note In most cases, you must configure the T-indicator only when the router uses two-stage dialing. If Direct Inward Dialing (DID) is configured in the inbound POTS dial peer, the router uses one-stage dialing, which means that the full dialed string is used to match outbound dial peers. The only exception is when the ISDN overlap-receiving command is configured; the ISDN overlap-receiving feature requires the T-indicator.
 

 

 

Use the command "debug voip dialpeer" for a better analisys.

 

Regards.

Community Member

It looks like with the 00 it

It looks like with the 00 it is actually only going to take those digits and then do nothing with the rest of the digits. With the T - it may be working properly for you, but the T says take all digits with out limiting them, BUT, there is a 15 second wait after entering the digits. If you do want to test the T try pressing # after entering your digits.or you could use "00........"  

 

I could be wrong, but give that a shot..

 

2 REPLIES

Hi. See here:http://www.cisco

Hi. See here:http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/ios/12_2/voice/configuration/guide/fvvfax_c/vvfpeers.html

Fixed- and Variable-Length Dial Plans

Fixed-length dialing plans, in which all the dial-peer destination patterns have a fixed length, are sufficient for most voice networks because the telephone number strings are of known lengths. Some voice networks, however, require variable-length dial plans, particularly for international calls, which use telephone numbers of different lengths.

 

If you enter the timeout T-indicator at the end of the destination pattern in an outbound voice-network dial peer, the router accepts a fixed-length dial string and then waits for additional dialed digits. The timeout character must be an uppercase T. The following dial-peer configuration shows how the T-indicator is set to allow variable-length dial strings:

 

dial-peer voice 1 voip
 destination-pattern 2222T
 session target ipv4:10.10.1.1

In the example above, the router accepts the digits 2222, and then waits for an unspecified number of additional digits. The router can collect up to 31 additional digits, as long as the interdigit timeout has not expired. When the interdigit timeout expires, the router places the call.

The default value for the interdigit timeout is 10 seconds. Unless the default value is changed, using the T-indicator adds 10 seconds to each call setup because the call is not attempted until the timer has expired (unless the # character is used as a terminator). You should therefore reduce the voice-port interdigit timeout value if you use variable-length dial plans. You can change the interdigit timeout by using the timeouts inter-digit voice-port command.

 

The calling party can immediately terminate the interdigit timeout by entering the # character. If the # character is entered while the router is waiting for additional digits, the # character is treated as a terminator; it is not treated as part of the dial string or sent across the network. But if the # character is entered before the router begins waiting for additional digits (meaning that the # is entered as part of the fixed-length destination pattern), then the # character is treated as a dialed digit.

 

For example, if the destination pattern is configured as 2222...T, then the entire dialed string of 2222#9999 is collected, but if the dialed string is 2222#99#99, the #99 at the end of the dialed digits is not collected because the final # character is treated as a terminator. You can change the termination character by using the dial-peer terminator command.

Note In most cases, you must configure the T-indicator only when the router uses two-stage dialing. If Direct Inward Dialing (DID) is configured in the inbound POTS dial peer, the router uses one-stage dialing, which means that the full dialed string is used to match outbound dial peers. The only exception is when the ISDN overlap-receiving command is configured; the ISDN overlap-receiving feature requires the T-indicator.
 

 

 

Use the command "debug voip dialpeer" for a better analisys.

 

Regards.

Community Member

It looks like with the 00 it

It looks like with the 00 it is actually only going to take those digits and then do nothing with the rest of the digits. With the T - it may be working properly for you, but the T says take all digits with out limiting them, BUT, there is a 15 second wait after entering the digits. If you do want to test the T try pressing # after entering your digits.or you could use "00........"  

 

I could be wrong, but give that a shot..

 

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