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Is there really a Cisco VPN client for Linux? _Really?_

Hello folks,           

        I've finally after almost experiencing a brain aneurysm by trying to think too hard got my Cisco 881-SEC-K9 router properly configured for a multipoint IPSec VPN tunnel to my Amazon Virtual Private Cloud, so that hurdle is finally passed and I actually feel it was a very important milestone in my life somehow. I never thought I'd see the day I actually got my hands on a legitimate Cisco non-stink... erm.. I mean, non-linksys router. Now I just can't seem to find a 'client' VPN program for Linux. I'm currently running a Xen Hypervisor environment on openSUSE Linux because it's the only Linux distribution that completes all of my strenous requirements in a Linux server environment. It's also the most mature, and secure Linux on this planet, making it the most appreciable Linux distribution for my research needs.  Using NetworkManager is not really an option for a basic Linux server environment, and OpenVPN is just too confusing to comprehend for my tiny little head.  I've heard mention of some mysterious "Easy VPN" but after hours of digging online can't find any information about it, even the Cisco download link leads to a Page Not Found error.  I do see a Linux VPN API for the AnyConnect program, but is that an actual VPN client, or just an API?  It seems to want my money to download it but I don't have any money nor do I really know what it is because it's all secretive-like, closed source, and I can't even find a simple README file on it explaining what it is exactly.  I'm just an out-of-work software developer trying to connect to my home router for personal use and I can't really afford to fork over a million and a half dollars for a single program that I'm only going to need to download once in my lifetime that should have been included with the router in the first place. I more than likely won't even be able to figure out how to use the program anyways because I don't know anything about VPN connections which is why I bought this router so I can try to figure it all out as part of the not-for-profit open source, volunteer research I'm presently trying to conduct.  Is there some kind of evaluation or trial period for personal use? That would be really nice so I could at least figure out if I'm going to be able to figure it out or not.  I hate throwing money away when it's in such short supply these days. There's really no alternative to a Cisco router.  It's an absolute necessity for the things I'm trying to accomplish, so trying to settle for something else and going on with my life is not really an option. No, this is something I just need to face head on and get it over with.

<Rant>

       Maybe I have a little too much crazy in me for my own good, but I don't see why it should take so much money just to learn how to do something for personal reference, it's not really a skill I would ever use otherwise.  Wouldn't it be great if Cisco made their VPN client open source and free to the public to use and modify, to improve on, to learn and to grow and bring the whole world closer together as a community? Even the source code to the old discontinued Cisco VPN client could be used as a valuable learning tool for some poor starving college student or Open Source Software developer somewhere trying to get by on Ramen Noodles and Ramen Noodle Sauce on Toast (don't tell me you never thought about it).  Through the ripple effect, It would drastically improve sales over the course of time, because it would open the door to a whole new market where those who previously could not afford to participate now could. That's the true power of Open Source. It creates a more skilled work force for the future by openly contributing and sharing knowledge together. What if the next big internet technology and the solution to world tyranny - the solution to end all wars forever - were locked in the mind of an unemployed software developer who couldn't afford to upgrade their cisco router software or access the software they needed because it was closed source and required committing to an expensive service contract to download?  That would be just terrible, wouldn't it?  I guess there's no way to ever know for sure. I suppose I'd be just as happy if some kind soul out there could point me to an easy to use alternative to an always on VPN connection that runs in the background which doesn't require NetworkManager or having to spend days upon days digging through and trying to comprehend either some really poor or extremely complex documentation?  I apologize for all the run on sentences posed as questions, but I've just got some serious mental burnout from all of this, being unemployed is some hard work folks. I could really use a vacation.  Perhaps a camping trip to the coast is in order after I get this working, that sounds nice, doesn't it? Nothing like a good summer thunder storm on the ocean beach - far away from technology - to refresh the mind.

</Rant>

"eschew surplusage".
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Cisco Employee

Is there _really_ a Cisco VPN client for Linux? Really?

I will not go into all the discussion in there, but what you might want to look into is vpnc and openconnect.

Both opensource project which seem to be working with Cisco devices, for a long time I was a user of vpnc.

http://www.infradead.org/openconnect/

http://www.unix-ag.uni-kl.de/~massar/vpnc/

Looks like some of your questions concerns should be directed towards your Cisco rep.

There is a AC client for Linux, (both GUI and CLI component). If you have problems finding it - get it from "pkg" file (specifically for linux), which is essentially a zip.

2 REPLIES
Cisco Employee

Is there _really_ a Cisco VPN client for Linux? Really?

I will not go into all the discussion in there, but what you might want to look into is vpnc and openconnect.

Both opensource project which seem to be working with Cisco devices, for a long time I was a user of vpnc.

http://www.infradead.org/openconnect/

http://www.unix-ag.uni-kl.de/~massar/vpnc/

Looks like some of your questions concerns should be directed towards your Cisco rep.

There is a AC client for Linux, (both GUI and CLI component). If you have problems finding it - get it from "pkg" file (specifically for linux), which is essentially a zip.

New Member

Re: Is there really a Cisco VPN client for Linux? _Really?_

I do tend to talk too much and I don't mince any words either.  What I am however, is really appreciative for the help. I know you hear that all the time, but you have no idea how much time and headache you just saved me.  I think vpnc might be just what I've been looking for, unless someone can think of a client for Linux that I might be able to throw a little further.  I'm very security minded now, after the backlash of Blackhat 2013, there's no telling which direction the internet might head next. Oh, you didn't hear? Well wether they realize it or not, DARPA basically declared war with other government agencies by releasing their own version of a spy program for civilians to use against the whoever -- possibly even the governmnet itself. They even went so far as to suggest it's private usage to blanket entire cities in information gathering. Civilians are a powerful foe, as they are not bound by the oath of office, any evidence they obtain is admissible in court, wether they know that or not. There's a very important reason for that. It's to prevent another civil war from ever happening, we shed enough blood the first time around less people forgot.  It's something that can and will be avoided because our civilization has advanced beyond the need for bloodshed. The courts have to obey the majority rule, no matter what. For the first time in history, cyberwarfare can reach into the physical world to cause serious damage to physical structures like the nuclear facility incident in Iran.  There's scarry bills trying to sneak through congress that are changing the landscape of technology forever for the entire world. We're at a pivotal point now where things can happen. It will be interesting to see how it all plays out over the next decade or so. No matter which way you look at it, just be preparerd to sell a whole lot of routers.

"eschew surplusage".
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