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Community Member

Backup circuit on another device

I have a backup wireless circuit attached to another device. Is there a way to automate a route change when my main frame circuit goes down? As in my router sees the interface down and re-routes traffic to another router without me manually making the change? I am using only static routes. Any ideas?

Thanks

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Accepted Solutions
Hall of Fame Super Gold

Re: Backup circuit on another device

Luke

You certainly can use floating static routes without any interesting traffic. A normal static route and a floating static route both just indicate where to send traffic - when there is any traffic. The floating static route is a static route with a higher administrative distance. The floating static route will be inserted into the routing table if the normal static route (for the same prefix) is withdrawn from the routing table.

The concept of interesting traffic is generally associated with dial technology where you need interesting traffic to initiate a connection. It is not clear to me from the limited description of your environment whether you need to be concerned about interesting traffic or not. But the floating static route is certainly independent of the need for interesting traffic.

HTH

Rick

5 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Gold

Re: Backup circuit on another device

Luke

Unless there are aspects of your environment that we do not know about, I would think that floating static routes would meet your requirements. You would have a normal static route on your primary router pointing to the frame relay interface. You would configure a floating static which points to the device with the backup circuit. As long as the frame relay interface is up the normal static route is used. If the frame relay interface goes down then the floating static route is inserted into the routing table and traffic is sent to the backup device. When frame relay comes up again the normal static route is put back into the routing table.

If you want to be sure that the floating static route will be used there is a feature for reliable static routes with object tracking. This link has information that would get you started:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps5413/products_feature_guide09186a00801d862d.html

HTH

Rick

Community Member

Re: Backup circuit on another device

Can you use floating static routes without any interesting traffic?

Hall of Fame Super Gold

Re: Backup circuit on another device

Luke

You certainly can use floating static routes without any interesting traffic. A normal static route and a floating static route both just indicate where to send traffic - when there is any traffic. The floating static route is a static route with a higher administrative distance. The floating static route will be inserted into the routing table if the normal static route (for the same prefix) is withdrawn from the routing table.

The concept of interesting traffic is generally associated with dial technology where you need interesting traffic to initiate a connection. It is not clear to me from the limited description of your environment whether you need to be concerned about interesting traffic or not. But the floating static route is certainly independent of the need for interesting traffic.

HTH

Rick

Community Member

Re: Backup circuit on another device

That is what I thought, just wanted to make sure. Thanks, Rick!

Luke

Hall of Fame Super Gold

Re: Backup circuit on another device

Luke

Thanks for using the rating system to indicate that there is a solution to your issue. (and thanks for the rating). It makes the forum much more useful when people can read about a problem and can know that they will read a solution to the problem that worked.

I encourage you to continue your participation in the forum.

HTH

Rick

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