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Bandwidth of WAN Circuit

Dear Expert,

There are around 30M - 40M database files to be replicated between HK and TW. The replication interval between two DB servers is around 5 mins. How much bandwidth is required and what type of WAN circuit is better (e.g. ADSL, MetroE, IPLC, IPVPN, ... etc)?

How do I calculate the bandwidth to be required?

Rdgs

Anita

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions

Re: Bandwidth of WAN Circuit

time the file size by 8 ( bytes to bits) then divide that number by the amount of seconds in your transfer window I.e 60 for 1minute Then add at least 10% for losses and overheads. Then that number should give you the required circuit speed in bits per second.

Sent from Cisco Technical Support iPad App

Bandwidth of WAN Circuit

You need to have ample spare capacity in order to be able to handle the transfers in a timely fashion.

Lets take 40M byte > this equals roughly 400Mbit.

Transfer time for this volume is 5mins = 300s. Lets say we want to do it in 100s in order to create sufficient slack.

You may need to send (at least some) other traffic as well.

The resulting BW per second = 400 Mbit/100s = 4Mbit.

You can achieve this speed via most of the line types you mentioned.

Now you know the bandwidth, you can start looking for the line/provider with the best price/quality ratio.

regards,

Leo

3 REPLIES

Re: Bandwidth of WAN Circuit

time the file size by 8 ( bytes to bits) then divide that number by the amount of seconds in your transfer window I.e 60 for 1minute Then add at least 10% for losses and overheads. Then that number should give you the required circuit speed in bits per second.

Sent from Cisco Technical Support iPad App

Bandwidth of WAN Circuit

You need to have ample spare capacity in order to be able to handle the transfers in a timely fashion.

Lets take 40M byte > this equals roughly 400Mbit.

Transfer time for this volume is 5mins = 300s. Lets say we want to do it in 100s in order to create sufficient slack.

You may need to send (at least some) other traffic as well.

The resulting BW per second = 400 Mbit/100s = 4Mbit.

You can achieve this speed via most of the line types you mentioned.

Now you know the bandwidth, you can start looking for the line/provider with the best price/quality ratio.

regards,

Leo

Super Bronze

Bandwidth of WAN Circuit

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Posting

Just wanted to add that although as the other posters have noted you can calculate bandwidth that's necessary to move x amount of bits or bytes in some time interval there are other variables that can impact whether you'll be able to transfer your files in the time window required.

For instance, it can make a difference whether the 30 to 40 MB is transferred as one file or lots of files.  It can make a difference whether multiple files are transferred concurrently or sequentially. It can make a difference what network protocol (also its version/"flavor") and what application is transferring files.  Latency and error rate can impact transfer performance, as can also network device and end host device buffering and windowing resource allocations.

Fortunately, your requirements and locations probably won't be much impacted by such considerations, but they can arise.

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