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New Member

Debug Commands For Cellular cards

I am trying to figure out why the cell card on my 2811 router is dropping service with my provider (verizon). I have tried the debug cellular <int> messages all command but all that appears to be giving is a bunch of hex messages that really don't mean anything to me. What I am looking for is information as to what is happening when the card drops and then comes back up. I am researching and would appreciate any ideas as to what debug commands I would need to set up to see this.

  • WAN Routing and Switching
2 REPLIES
New Member

Re: Debug Commands For Cellular cards

New Member

Re: Debug Commands For Cellular cards

The best way to tell what is happening is to use the "show cellular x/y/z connection" command.  Output example;

Router#sh cell 0 connection
Phone number of outgoing call = #777
HDR AT State = Idle, HDR Session State = Open
HDR Session Info:
    UATI (Hex) = 0080:0580:0000:0023:0C0A:F8E1:D1C2:C420
    Color Code = 162, RATI = 0xF2D7440E
    Session duration = 1920 msecs, Session start = 1033339497 msecs
    Session end = 1033342707 msecs, Authentication Status = Authenticated
HDR DRC Value = 8, DRC Cover = 1, RRI = 9.6 kbps
Current Transmitted = 541 bytes, Received = 538 bytes
Total Transmitted = 170643 KB, Received = 645744 KB
Current Call Status = DORMANT
Current Call Duration = 37 secs
Total Call Duration = 280144980 seconds
Current Call Type = AT Packet Call Dormant
Last Call Disconnect Reason = Base station release (No reason)
Last Connection Error = None
HDR DDTM (Data Dedicated Transmission Mode) Preference = Off
Mobile IP Error Code (RFC-2002) = 0 (Registration accepted)
Router#

This indicates either your connection was idle for too long or the router sent an "IP Violation" meaning it sent a packet with either a source and/or destination IP that was a private IP.  Since carriers do not have a route to the private IP, the not only drop the packet, they also drop your connection.

Happy hunting.

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