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New Member

Forward decision

Hi seniors, On what basis a CISCO IOS decides to drop a packet or forward a packet, I mean how a packet with 192.168.10.1 will be match with the follwing table

1. 192.168.10.64/26

2. 192.168.10.0/30

3. 192.168.10.4/30

4. 192.168.10.8/30

5. 192.168.10.192/26

6. 192.168.10.128/26

I am not caring for outgoing ports, just want to know how IOS will decide about the route, with classless & classful. regards, Tahir

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Blue

Re: Forward decision

Haj Tahir:

A router maintains a routing table for various networks. It learns about networks through dynamic routing protocols, static routes, or by virtue of being directly conneected to the network.

Giving you a simple, abridged version of things, when a router receives a packet on one of its interfaces, it will examine the destination address in the IP datagram.

It will then look in its routing table for a route to the network. If the destination address falls within the range of one of the networks it has in its routing table, it will forward it according to the next hop given in the routing table entry. If it has more than one route, it will take the route with the longest prefix match.

So, if it has a route to 192.168.0.0/16 and 192.168.10.0/30, it will route according to the latter - the more specific entry (longest prefix match), even though 192.168.0.0 includes the host address.

To answer your question regarding the 192 address you gave us, you must understand subnet masks. The IP address 192.168.10.1 is a host address that falls within network 192.168.10.0/30. The /30 mask will give you 4 addresses:

192.168.10.0 <---subnet address

192.168.10.1 <---host address

192.168.10.2 <---host address

192.168.10.3 <---Directed broadcast

For the router to successfully route subnets of major networks, you should have the ip classless command configured on the router. Of course, you would also have to deploy a routing protocol that supports classless routing and VLSM, like OSPF or EIGRP.

Volumes can be written about all this, so this is just a basic overview to answer your specific question.

HTH

IF so, please rate this post.

4 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Bronze

Re: Forward decision

2. 192.168.10.0/30

as it has the longest mask for that destination IP.

__

Edison.

Blue

Re: Forward decision

Haj Tahir:

A router maintains a routing table for various networks. It learns about networks through dynamic routing protocols, static routes, or by virtue of being directly conneected to the network.

Giving you a simple, abridged version of things, when a router receives a packet on one of its interfaces, it will examine the destination address in the IP datagram.

It will then look in its routing table for a route to the network. If the destination address falls within the range of one of the networks it has in its routing table, it will forward it according to the next hop given in the routing table entry. If it has more than one route, it will take the route with the longest prefix match.

So, if it has a route to 192.168.0.0/16 and 192.168.10.0/30, it will route according to the latter - the more specific entry (longest prefix match), even though 192.168.0.0 includes the host address.

To answer your question regarding the 192 address you gave us, you must understand subnet masks. The IP address 192.168.10.1 is a host address that falls within network 192.168.10.0/30. The /30 mask will give you 4 addresses:

192.168.10.0 <---subnet address

192.168.10.1 <---host address

192.168.10.2 <---host address

192.168.10.3 <---Directed broadcast

For the router to successfully route subnets of major networks, you should have the ip classless command configured on the router. Of course, you would also have to deploy a routing protocol that supports classless routing and VLSM, like OSPF or EIGRP.

Volumes can be written about all this, so this is just a basic overview to answer your specific question.

HTH

IF so, please rate this post.

New Member

Re: Forward decision

Thanks for both the replies. Lamav can you further clear the concept involved in how IOS takes care while we configure "classless" and how differently when we configure "classful" or in what conditions either one is necessary. Thanks again for seniors help as I am novice in networking field. Tahir.

Blue

Re: Forward decision

Tahir:

Let me do you a favor and give you an excellent link that describes the route selection process in pretty good detail. Moreover, there is a section that addresses the ip classless command and how the forwarding process is effected by it.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk365/technologies_tech_note09186a0080094823.shtml

HTH

Shukrun

Victor

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