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noob question

finalprojectit1320.pkt           

Hello, I am new to the cisco discussion forum, and weill fairly new to the cisco world. I am currently in school for my associates degree in the IT field. My question is...I have a network setup in Packet Tracer...4 2811 routers, 2 2950 24 port switches and some pc's...I have all routes set up, statically, cause thats what the project calls for...I can ping my networks that are directly connected but when I ping other networks I lose packets.  Like I said I'm kinda a noob so bare with me...I have double checked and even triple checked my routes. I have set the clockrate and bandwidth on all the serial ports too.  I wasn't sure where to post this so sorry for bothering you.  Any ideas...I'm not neccessaritly looking for the answer if you could just point in the right direction.

thank you

steve

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4 REPLIES

Re: noob question

Stephen,

My understanding is that you are pinging networks locally and that's okay, but anything remote doesn't work. Assuming that you're not using NAT in this topology, routing requires that the source knows how to get to the destination and the destination knows how to get back to the source. For example:

Router A WAN: 192.168.1.1/24

Router B WAN: 192.168.1.2/24

Router B LAN:   192.168.5.1/24

PC: 192.168.5.50

Router A (192.168.1.1/24) connects to Router B (192.168.1.2/24). Router B connects to the LAN switch on Router B's inside interface (192.168.5.1/24). The PC connects to the switch and it's IP is 192.168.5.50. The PC will have a default gateway of 192.168.5.1 (inside interface on Router B). When the PC pings 192.168.1.1 (Router A), it will go to Router B since it doesn't know about the 192.168.1.0/24 network (this is where the default gateway comes in play). Router B will get it and say "I know how to get to 192.168.1.0" and sends it there. Router A will drop the traffic though because it doesn't know how to get to 192.168.5.0/24 (where the PC is). You'd need to add a static route on Router A that states "ip route 192.168.5.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.2". Then your traffic wouldn't drop.

I hope this wasn't too confusing...

HTH,

John

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HTH, John *** Please rate all useful posts ***
Super Bronze

Re: noob question

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Posting

Ping from what to what?

A posted topology diagram would be helpful.  (Or Packet Tracer file.)

Do PCs have gateway defined?

All router's "know" (i.e. your static routes) all non-connected networks?

New Member

Re: noob question

Hey guys thanks for the speedy replies, I have my default gateways setup and I have a full routable topology, ha.... I think that's what it's called, my understanding of what I mean is I have fault tolerance set up so if one router was to go down the packets have a different path to take. I'm not sure how to add a file to this forum as it only has options for images and videos...when I don't have the extra routes in there ( for the fault tolerance ), I can ping everywhere.

New Member

noob question

Ha, I'm learning this forum slowly, I have attached the packet tracer file into my original post. 

thank you

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