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New Member

QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

I have a Cisco 2800 series ISR receiving 2 WAN links a 5Mbps fiber link and a 1.5Mbps T1. The Fiber is connected to the ISR on gigabit Ethernet 0/1, the T1 is on Serial 0 and our LAN side is connected on 0/0 to an HP Procurve Switch 3500-24. I am using BGP with both links, the 5Mbps fiber is setup as our primary and the T1 is the backup link.

I also have 3 remote sites that connect via a Sonicwall VPN 200 and have 3 VOIP phones, one at each site. Each site is on a cable or dsl connection 1.5Mbps or better.

I am having trouble with Quality of Service. During times of high upload and download, VOIP calls suffer, experiencing lag, choppiness and generally bad service. Sometimes during high load the VPN connections will lag and at worst drop connection. Ideally I’d like the VOIP calls and VPN connections to be the priority and impacted as little as possible during any times of high load.

I have some experience with CLI and setting up Cisco routers, I am in no way an expert and have little to no experience working with QoS. I’ve read through Cisco documentation for QoS but I am not sure what would be best. Below is our current configuration the only QoS change I’ve made or tried is turning on fair-queuing.

Any suggestions or solutions to make this work better would be appreciated.

Router#show running-config

Building configuration...

Current configuration : 2077 bytes

!

version 12.4

service timestamps debug datetime msec

service timestamps log datetime msec

no service password-encryption

!

hostname Router

!

boot-start-marker

boot-end-marker

!

no logging console

!

no aaa new-model

!

!

ip cef

!

!

multilink bundle-name authenticated

!

!

!

archive

log config

  hidekeys

!

!

!

!

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0

description LAN

ip address 10.0.0.254 255.255.255.0

duplex auto

speed auto

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/1

description WANprimary

ip address 20.10.10.104 255.255.255.252

duplex auto

speed auto

fair-queue

!

interface Serial0/0/0

description WANbackup

ip address 30.20.20.106 255.255.255.252

encapsulation ppp

no fair-queue

!

router bgp 50

no synchronization

bgp log-neighbor-changes

bgp bestpath as-path ignore

network 10.0.0.0 mask 255.255.255.0

neighbor 30.20.20.10 remote-as 10

neighbor 30.20.20.10 description WANbackup BGP

neighbor 30.20.20.10 ebgp-multihop 10

neighbor 30.20.20.10 update-source Serial0/0/0

neighbor 30.20.20.10 weight 100

neighbor 30.20.20.10 prefix-list WANprimary BGP-out out

neighbor 30.20.20.10 route-map WANbackup BGP-in in

neighbor 30.20.20.10 route-map WANbackup BGP-out out

neighbor 20.10.10.255 remote-as 40

neighbor 20.10.10.255 description WANprimary BGP

neighbor 20.10.10.255 ebgp-multihop 10

neighbor 20.10.10.255 update-source GigabitEthernet0/1

neighbor 20.10.10.255 weight 200

neighbor 20.10.10.255 prefix-list WANprimary BGP-out out

no auto-summary

!

ip forward-protocol nd

ip route 10.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 Null0 255

ip route 30.20.20.10 255.255.255.255 30.20.20.105

ip route 20.10.10.255 255.255.255.255 20.10.10.103

ip route 20.11.10.255 255.255.255.255 20.10.10.103

!

!

no ip http server

!

!

ip prefix-list WANprimary BGP-out seq 5 permit 10.0.0.0/24

route-map WANbackup BGP-in permit 10

set local-preference 80

set as-path prepend 50 50

!

route-map WANbackup BGP-out permit 10

set as-path prepend 50 50

!

!

!

control-plane

!

!

line con 0

line aux 0

line vty 0 4

login

!

scheduler allocate 20000 1000

!

end

8 REPLIES
Hall of Fame Super Bronze

Re: QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

1) Create an ACL to match the src/dst traffic for VOIP

access-list 101 permit ip src_voip_net dst_voip_net

2) Create a class-map to associate the ACL

class-map QoS_VOIP

match access-group 101

3) Create a policy-map to assoicate the class-map

policy-map QoS_VOIP

  class QoS_VOIP

    priority percent 15

  class class-default

4) Associate the policy-map to the interface in the output direction

interface GigabitEthernet0/1

bandwidth 5000

description WANprimary

ip address 20.10.10.104 255.255.255.252

duplex auto

speed auto

fair-queue

service-policy output QoS_VOIP

!

interface Serial0/0/0

bandwith 1500

description WANbackup

ip address 30.20.20.106 255.255.255.252

encapsulation ppp

no fair-queue

service-policy output QoS_VOIP

You must do the same on the remote routers.

Regards,

Edison

New Member

Re: QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

Thanks,I have a few questions and a comment.

Would this be a better solution than setting up something with IP Precedence bits?

Our remote users are using cable/dsl modem-routers so we may not be able to control their bandwidth allocation like that.

In this setup does the priority percentage reserve 15 of the bandwidth or gaurantee that? If no VOIP calls were being made could another type of traffic use our full 5Mbps or would 15% be unavailible? Could the VOIP traffic use more than 15% in this setup?

Would a similar setup be needed for VPN traffic or can something else be done with it to prevent it from dropping during high loads?

Thanks,

Hall of Fame Super Bronze

Re: QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

You can use IPP for marking - same can be said by using DSCP or COS - your choice.

Ideally, any type of QoS marking must be made closest to the source - then the router would match against the QoS marking instead of having an ACL.

The priority percentage will dequeue the matched traffic before any other type of traffic. It's not a reservation per say but if there is matched traffic vs regular traffic, the matched traffic will exit the interface first (up to the selected value). In your case, it will be 15% of the 5M pipe - that's the reason I added the 'bandwitdh' command because if you don't - the QoS will calculate based on the physical interface 100 or 1000Mbps.

You can use CBWFQ for VPN/IPSec traffic if you want to avoid tunnel drop off.

Regards,

Edison

New Member

Re: QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

We can mark the packets with IPP at our HP switch, I've read that 7 the highest priority is typically reserved for LAN traffic would it be better than to prioritize the VOIP traffic as 5 or 6? Once IP precedence markings are made what setup is needed on the router?

A related issue we are having, in our BGP setup the slower circuit is giving more and often prefered/better routes than the faster circuit. I have some things in place (local preference, as-prepending) to try and push as much traffic as I can toward the faster circuit but much of the upstream traffic still exits the slower circuit. Is there anyway to fix this? I belive this would help solve the problems we are having as much as QoS solutions.

Thanks.

Hall of Fame Super Bronze

Re: QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

Voice traffic should be IPP5

On the router, all you need to modify the class-map from my previous config recommendation.

The old class-map matched against an ACL while the new class-map will match against precedence 5.

As for the BGP, please post configs and routes in question.

Local preference will aid on traffic leaving your network. For traffic entering your network, you may need to employ AS-PATH Prepend out.

New Member

Re: QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

BGP configuration was posted above but reposted here for ease. The WANbackup link often gives better routes and traffic exits via this route despite the weights, prepending and local preference.

router bgp 50

no synchronization

bgp log-neighbor-changes

bgp bestpath as-path ignore

network 10.0.0.0 mask 255.255.255.0

neighbor 30.20.20.10 remote-as 10

neighbor 30.20.20.10 description WANbackup BGP

neighbor 30.20.20.10 ebgp-multihop 10

neighbor 30.20.20.10 update-source Serial0/0/0

neighbor 30.20.20.10 weight 100

neighbor 30.20.20.10 prefix-list WANprimary BGP-out out

neighbor 30.20.20.10 route-map WANbackup BGP-in in

neighbor 30.20.20.10 route-map WANbackup BGP-out out

neighbor 20.10.10.255 remote-as 40

neighbor 20.10.10.255 description WANprimary BGP

neighbor 20.10.10.255 ebgp-multihop 10

neighbor 20.10.10.255 update-source GigabitEthernet0/1

neighbor 20.10.10.255 weight 200

neighbor 20.10.10.255 prefix-list WANprimary BGP-out out

no auto-summary

!

ip forward-protocol nd

ip route 10.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 Null0 255

ip route 30.20.20.10 255.255.255.255 30.20.20.105

ip route 20.10.10.255 255.255.255.255 20.10.10.103

ip route 20.11.10.255 255.255.255.255 20.10.10.103

!

!

no ip http server

!

!

ip prefix-list WANprimary BGP-out seq 5 permit 10.0.0.0/24

route-map WANbackup BGP-in permit 10

set local-preference 80

set as-path prepend 50 50

!

route-map WANbackup BGP-out permit 10

set as-path prepend 50 50

New Member

Re: QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

Doing some more reading it looks like CBWFQ is the way to go to get the traffic out in timely manner. I see 2 main types of traffic that need to be classified and given a percentage amount, VOIP and VPN. VOIP should be the priority and I'm thinking 20% of bandwidth during congestion. VPN 15% and a lesser priority but still more important than general web traffic. For the sake of example we'll say the VOIP hardware at my site has an IP of: 10.0.0.5 and the VPN: 10.0.0.10

The ACL configuration itself is where I'm a little confused. Below is my thinking but maynot be correct.

Router(config)# class-map VOIP-class

Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 101

Router(config)# policy-map VOIP

Router(config-pmap)# class VOIP-class

Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 20

Router(config-if)# service-policy output VOIP

Router(config)# access-list permit ip 10.0.0.5?

How best should the ACL's be configured? How would they be configured using IPP? 1 end user with the VOIP phones themselves have a static ip the other 2 have dynamic from their ISP.

Thanks.

New Member

Re: QoS on a 2800 with VOIP, VPN and BGP

For configurations such as this one, my company's tool LiveAction can be a big help. It can show you how your QoS has been configured, how it is  performing, and can help guide you to a proper configuration using templates based on Cisco's SRND. Here's a  link to the download:

http://www.actionpacked.com/liveaction-2.0-download

Load the  tool, add your routers, then pull up the QoS interface view of the interface having the  problem. That will show you what's configured and how it's performing.  In fact, if you'd like, give me a call and I can walk you through it.  These types of configurations can be really complicated coming from the  CLI only. Let me know if I can be of further assistance.

David McDaniel

dmcdaniel@actionpacked.com

808-423-1900 x809

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